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BlueWaveNeverEnd

(8,492 posts)
Thu Feb 29, 2024, 07:27 PM Feb 2024

Demographic crisis in Japan and South Korea as birthrates reach new record lows.

South Korea's fertility rate, already the lowest globally, continued its dramatic decline in 2023, according to Statistics Korea.

The average number of expected babies per South Korean woman during her reproductive life plummeted to a record low of 0.72 last year, from 0.78 in 2022, according to the government agency.

In South Korea, a societal shift has seen a rise in young adults living alone and an increase in unmarried people, particularly among men. This trend underscores the challenges facing South Korea as it grapples with the implications of its declining fertility rate on its future economic competitiveness and societal structure.

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The challenges of balancing career advancement with childcare predominantly fall on women, often resulting in extended career breaks and hindering professional progression.

The demographic shift is not only affecting the labor market but also the social fabric of South Korea. Young adults aged 19 to 34, who constituted almost a third of the population in 1990, have dwindled to a mere fifth of the total population by 2020, Newsweek reported.

This group is projected to further decrease to 5.21 million by 2050. Meanwhile, individuals aged 65 and above are increasing in proportion, set to outnumber young adults by the decade's end.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/health/other/south-korea-s-baby-bust-reaches-crisis-level/ar-BB1j6GQB

Japan's new births fall to record low in 2023 as demographic woes deepen

TOKYO (Reuters) -The number of babies born in Japan fell for an eighth straight year to a fresh record low in 2023, preliminary government data showed on Tuesday, underscoring the daunting task the country faces in trying to stem depopulation.

The number of births fell 5.1% from a year earlier to 758,631, while the number of marriages slid 5.9% to 489,281 -- the first time in 90 years the number fell below 500,000 -- foreboding a further decline in the population as out-of-wedlock births are rare in Japan.

Asked about the latest data, Japan's top government spokesperson said the government will take "unprecedented steps" to cope with the declining birthrate, such as expanding childcare and promoting wage hikes for younger workers.
"The declining birthrate is in a critical situation," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yoshimasa Hayashi told reporters. "The next six years or so until 2030, when the number of young people will rapidly decline, will be the last chance to reverse the trend."

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Japan's population will likely decline by about 30% to 87 million by 2070, with four out of every 10 people aged 65 or older, according to estimates by the National Institute of Population and Social Security Research.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world/japans-new-births-fall-to-record-low-in-2023-as-demographic-woes-deepen/ar-BB1iYnjB
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Demographic crisis in Japan and South Korea as birthrates reach new record lows. (Original Post) BlueWaveNeverEnd Feb 2024 OP
Crapola......................... Lovie777 Feb 2024 #1
If a country improves the lives of women, makes it easier for them to Irish_Dem Feb 2024 #2
Some countries are paying couples to have kids redqueen Feb 2024 #8
Exactly, it is not just about money. Irish_Dem Feb 2024 #9
Socioeconomic factors aside, my suspicion is that it's partly driven by PFAS chemicals in the environment lostnfound Mar 2024 #19
I think hormone disruption is a very big factor. Irish_Dem Mar 2024 #20
Yeah, that's the planet's big problem! Basic LA Feb 2024 #3
Declining birth rates are good news. limbicnuminousity Feb 2024 #4
This☝️☝️☝️☝️☝️☝️☝️☝️ roamer65 Feb 2024 #5
Exactly. Scrivener7 Feb 2024 #6
The problem is a very low tax base and work force Elessar Zappa Feb 2024 #7
Quite the conundrum. limbicnuminousity Feb 2024 #10
This. TheProle Feb 2024 #11
There are shops in my neighborhood betsuni Feb 2024 #12
interesting. Thanks for the first hand report. BlueWaveNeverEnd Mar 2024 #16
You're welcome! betsuni Mar 2024 #17
Meaningful maternity leave. Better wages and retirement plans for women. Childcare. And something... Hekate Feb 2024 #13
Immigration, yes. betsuni Mar 2024 #18
i think the problem is two-fold Takket Feb 2024 #14
"lot of people just don't want to bring their kids into a world that is falling apart" redqueen Feb 2024 #15

Irish_Dem

(50,290 posts)
2. If a country improves the lives of women, makes it easier for them to
Thu Feb 29, 2024, 07:34 PM
Feb 2024

pay for and juggle family and home, maybe they will start having children.

redqueen

(115,113 posts)
8. Some countries are paying couples to have kids
Thu Feb 29, 2024, 08:28 PM
Feb 2024

That's not going to work. That is definitely part of the problem, but another part is women are sick of being exploited for free labor and being treated like things to be used. The failure of most men to do their fair share of labor in a household and/or the habit of men making ridiculous demands (sexual or otherwise), has made a lot of women give up on dating let alone marrying.

This is going to get worse. And really it's not a bad thing. the planet can't replenish resources as fast as we are using them up.

Irish_Dem

(50,290 posts)
9. Exactly, it is not just about money.
Thu Feb 29, 2024, 08:34 PM
Feb 2024

It is about treating women with respect.
Childcare, education, maternity leave, healthcare, etc.

lostnfound

(16,240 posts)
19. Socioeconomic factors aside, my suspicion is that it's partly driven by PFAS chemicals in the environment
Fri Mar 1, 2024, 07:36 AM
Mar 2024

I’ve read numerous studies linking the prevalence of PFAS to infertility, hormone disruption in both men and women.
South Korea has one of the highest rates of PFAS contamination.
Other generations have been poor, or juggled family and home businesses, but nonetheless each generation has had young men and women anxious to get into relationships with each other.
Dating behavior is WAYY down.
Electronic distractions are a contributor, and social disengagement. But biology is more powerful than economics.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/apr/06/forever-chemicals-infertility-women-pfas-blood?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

Irish_Dem

(50,290 posts)
20. I think hormone disruption is a very big factor.
Fri Mar 1, 2024, 09:03 AM
Mar 2024

Due to the toxic soup we live in.

I have been noticing this too.

 

Basic LA

(2,047 posts)
3. Yeah, that's the planet's big problem!
Thu Feb 29, 2024, 07:46 PM
Feb 2024

Not enough people! Let's double that 8 billion Pronto!
Seriously, what ever happened to zero population growth? To overcrowding and Malthusian Theory and Soylent Green?

limbicnuminousity

(1,409 posts)
10. Quite the conundrum.
Thu Feb 29, 2024, 08:36 PM
Feb 2024

Maybe, just maybe....corporations might pay their taxes and pick up the slack. And the work force is already being replaced by AI.

The capitalists are primarily interested in expanding the consumer-base and growing profit margins, not taking care of the elderly.

betsuni

(26,203 posts)
12. There are shops in my neighborhood
Thu Feb 29, 2024, 09:31 PM
Feb 2024

(small rural city in Japan) desperate for workers. Sometimes there's a new young person hired but if it's a guy never lasts long. Cashiers, hospitals, supermarkets -- women. I'm assuming elderly care facilities desperately need workers. One of my husband's friends (man) only lasted a few weeks working in one.

Husband's niece, in her late twenties, has no desire to marry or have children or ever move out of the house. I just found out she takes trips to South Korea by herself and was surprised, but younger generations are completely different from how everyone used to do things in groups, and they're certainly not going to give up their lives for some stupid conservative company or be a housewife. Saw a news program about how difficult it is for start-ups in Japan, depressing. Old conservative oblivious men still in charge.

Hekate

(91,616 posts)
13. Meaningful maternity leave. Better wages and retirement plans for women. Childcare. And something...
Thu Feb 29, 2024, 09:43 PM
Feb 2024

…else that we in America need to be forcefully reminded of: openness to immigration of foreigners, which is something that kept the US young and vital while other countries aged.


Takket

(21,892 posts)
14. i think the problem is two-fold
Thu Feb 29, 2024, 09:50 PM
Feb 2024

it is just too expensive to have kids.

a lot of people just don't want to bring their kids into a world that is falling apart environmentally, and i don't blame them. we're only seeing the beginning of the effect of global warming.

redqueen

(115,113 posts)
15. "lot of people just don't want to bring their kids into a world that is falling apart"
Thu Feb 29, 2024, 11:15 PM
Feb 2024

Sadly this seems to be a not uncommon reason. Can't really argue based on climate change alone.

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