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applegrove

(119,548 posts)
Sat Apr 13, 2024, 07:05 PM Apr 13

Tyralindquist1: "I got breast cancer on my right side when I was 44. Then again on my left at 58. The VAST improvement

Last edited Sat Apr 13, 2024, 09:34 PM - Edit history (3)


Post by @tyralindquist1
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Tyralindquist1 (found on threads):

"I got breast cancer on my right side when I was 44.

Then again on my left at 58.

The VAST improvement in diagnosis and treatment was amazing. Now I’m a cancer-free 70.

Do I think people who are diagnosed today should have to go through the struggles I did decades ago? Of course not!

The stretch I want to make is about folks benefitting from improvements in student loans. I am simply glad for everyone whose loan is forgiven. Can we pause here and be happy for the good fortune of others?"
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Tyralindquist1: "I got breast cancer on my right side when I was 44. Then again on my left at 58. The VAST improvement (Original Post) applegrove Apr 13 OP
Always celebrate anyone's good fortune. MOMFUDSKI Apr 13 #1
Congratulations on your doing so well Botany Apr 13 #2
It was not me. Why i put it in quotes. Was someone on Threads. applegrove Apr 13 #3
Free Advice Botany Apr 13 #5
The poster I quoted compared cancer treatment to student loans being forgiven. It was applegrove Apr 13 #8
Yes! Times change and so do people. Hope22 Apr 13 #4
Similar situations by proxy: forgotmylogin Apr 13 #6
Glad you and your peeps are okay. Science is amazing. applegrove Apr 13 #7
Not really a similar situation. Ms. Toad Apr 14 #9
She was being magnanimous. Not a bad way to be. applegrove Apr 14 #10
One can be magnanimous Ms. Toad Apr 14 #11
Not all student loan stories are the same. Some people got robbed by sketchy educators. applegrove Apr 14 #12

MOMFUDSKI

(6,316 posts)
1. Always celebrate anyone's good fortune.
Sat Apr 13, 2024, 07:09 PM
Apr 13

There but for the grace . . . is another form of celebration. So happy for your reaching 70 and cancer-free. We are all in this together.

Botany

(70,915 posts)
2. Congratulations on your doing so well
Sat Apr 13, 2024, 08:22 PM
Apr 13

I lost a friend of 30 + years in February of
'23 to that disease. It is wicked. So glad
about your victories.

applegrove

(119,548 posts)
3. It was not me. Why i put it in quotes. Was someone on Threads.
Sat Apr 13, 2024, 08:26 PM
Apr 13

I liked the analogy to student loan borrowers getting some relief from Biden and how people who paid it all back before the Biden relief happened have nothing to envy. Someone else lucked out great. Same with new treatments for cancer.

Envy and resentment are Republucan building blocks of their base. We are better than that.

Botany

(70,915 posts)
5. Free Advice
Sat Apr 13, 2024, 08:35 PM
Apr 13

On these beautiful days of spring forget about
Republicans v Democrats and go outside and
enjoy the beauty.

applegrove

(119,548 posts)
8. The poster I quoted compared cancer treatment to student loans being forgiven. It was
Sat Apr 13, 2024, 09:32 PM
Apr 13

her point. Not mine. I just thought it was a good analogy. Here is the full out-take including her opinion on Biden's loan forgiveness. Applegrove

"SNIP............

Tyralindquist1 (found on threads):

"I got breast cancer on my right side when I was 44.

Then again on my left at 58.

The VAST improvement in diagnosis and treatment was amazing. Now I’m a cancer-free 70.

Do I think people who are diagnosed today should have to go through the struggles I did decades ago? Of course not!

The stretch I want to make is about folks benefitting from improvements in student loans. I am simply glad for everyone whose loan is forgiven. Can we pause here and be happy for the good fortune of others?"


..........SNIP"

Hope22

(2,003 posts)
4. Yes! Times change and so do people.
Sat Apr 13, 2024, 08:33 PM
Apr 13

When I was young and home with my child I did not like the concept of all day kindergarten or free preschool because I was on a tight budget and had already made those sacrifices myself. When I got to be 50 my mind changed. Get the children in safe learning environments and let’s get going! I don’t care that I paid for my child’s head start. I’m over it!

forgotmylogin

(7,565 posts)
6. Similar situations by proxy:
Sat Apr 13, 2024, 09:02 PM
Apr 13

My aunt had a breast tumor in the early 80s and they took her entire breast in a radical mastectomy to make sure they got all of it and she spent over a week in the hospital and weeks of home recovery before she went back to work.

My mom had a breast tumor in 2015 and it was removed laparoscopically in an out-patient procedure where they determined it hadn't metastasized anywhere else so she kept her breast. She was sore a couple days and fine by the end of the week.

Similarly, my dad had his gall bladder removed unexpectedly in the 70s, was in the hospital a week, and came home with a scar from his waist to his nipple and it took weeks before the muscle wall of his abdomen they cut into healed and he could return to work as an electrician.

I had my gall bladder removed unexpectedly in 2002 and I did spend a week in the hospital since it happened unexpectedly on a Friday night - a 1cm stone lodged in my bile duct and started to leach toxins (I was never in pain, just very uncomfortable until uncontrollable vomiting started) They admitted me, did the surgery Monday and removed it laparoscopically through my navel. (Usually it's scheduled as an outpatient procedure but mine never presented symptoms until it became an emergency) They said they *almost* couldn't get it out due to inflammation but luckily didn't have to cut more. They kept me 3 more days for IV antibiotics due to the fact it had started to go toxic. I have two pencil-diameter scars on my abdomen (the major cut was through the navel so it's not visible) had no major pain except it feeling like I'd done 1000 sit-ups (they explained that internal organs have very few pain receptors which is why I never noticed symptoms and was only mildly sore where the incisions happened.) The latex dressing caused blisters that were more of a problem than the pain; the only traumatic part was when they pulled the drainage tube out of me which was disturbing and only slightly painful at first because it was stuck due to dried blood and then felt so gross having a slimy tube pulled out of me. I barely needed the Vicodin they prescribed. I was back to work (in a casino) within a week.

Science is amazing.

applegrove

(119,548 posts)
7. Glad you and your peeps are okay. Science is amazing.
Sat Apr 13, 2024, 09:06 PM
Apr 13

Last edited Sat Apr 13, 2024, 10:18 PM - Edit history (2)

I liked that the op on Threads, Tyralindquist1, posted about her cancer and the improvements and used that as an analoogy for Student loan debters getting their loans paid off by Biden. Such an important liberal idea to be magnanimous and she did it in a very personal and powerful way using her victory over cancer.

Ms. Toad

(34,423 posts)
9. Not really a similar situation.
Sun Apr 14, 2024, 01:09 AM
Apr 14

1. The difference between cancer at 44 and cancer at 58 is significant. My great-grandmother, grandmother, mother, and I all were diagnosed with post-menopausal breast cancer. My mother twice. Two have died with (but not from) breast cancer. The other two are allive with no evidence of disease. All were diagnosed easity. The primary treatment for all of us was surgery. I believe I'm the only one who had any treatment beyond that. The date of diagnosis ranged from the 1950s to 2016.

Had any of us been diagnosed with breast cancer at 44, it would have been a very different story. Pre-menopausal breast cancer (regardless of what decade it was diagnosed) tends to be much more aggressive, tends to reqiure far more treatment, often including both radiation and chemo. So it is more the age of diagnosis, than the decade of treatment.

2. TyraLindquist did not choose to sign a contract agreeing to have breast cancer. It is something which happened to her. Everyone who has a student loan chose to take out that loan, and promised to repay it.

That doesn't mean I'm opposed to loan forgiveness (although I would probably put more conditions on it than many here would - e.g. I would forgive fewer loans for people seeking a second or third degree, fewer loans for people with higher paying jobs, etc.). My point is that this is not a helpful analogy because making a deliberate decision that turns out badly is different from passively having something happen to you.

applegrove

(119,548 posts)
10. She was being magnanimous. Not a bad way to be.
Sun Apr 14, 2024, 01:36 AM
Apr 14

Instead of envious which is the way the right wing likes their base.

Ms. Toad

(34,423 posts)
11. One can be magnanimous
Sun Apr 14, 2024, 01:46 AM
Apr 14

without using a flawed analogy.

Contracts are voluntary; cancer is not. That doesn't mean that contract relief is never warranted. It just isn't the same as relief from something which was never voluntary on your part.

applegrove

(119,548 posts)
12. Not all student loan stories are the same. Some people got robbed by sketchy educators.
Sun Apr 14, 2024, 01:59 AM
Apr 14

Some were unlucky with employment after the fact. There are many stories. I commend her very tough story as a way to illustrate that she feels happy for people who are getting a leg up even if she did not on the same issue. Magnanimous is my word of the month. Thank you for probing. I never would have thought about that word without you.

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