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Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:41 PM

Question: Should convicted felons be able to vote

after they have served their sentence? after probation or parole?
25 votes, 0 passes | Time left: Unlimited
yes after incarcaration is served
9 (36%)
yes while still in jail
11 (44%)
yes after probation or parole is over
4 (16%)
yes after all fines and restituion is paid
0 (0%)
not until 5 years after sentence is served
0 (0%)
not until 10 years after sentence is served
0 (0%)
lifetime ban
1 (4%)
other (share)
0 (0%)
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Disclaimer: This is an Internet poll

30 replies, 2403 views

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Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 30 replies Author Time Post
Reply Question: Should convicted felons be able to vote (Original post)
gopiscrap Nov 2013 OP
tblue Nov 2013 #1
get the red out Nov 2013 #2
el_bryanto Nov 2013 #3
gopiscrap Nov 2013 #4
tblue Nov 2013 #11
el_bryanto Nov 2013 #13
MindPilot Nov 2013 #22
Coyotl Nov 2013 #5
NuclearDem Nov 2013 #6
badtoworse Nov 2013 #17
kelliekat44 Nov 2013 #7
gopiscrap Nov 2013 #9
JVS Nov 2013 #12
William769 Nov 2013 #8
JVS Nov 2013 #10
petronius Nov 2013 #14
kestrel91316 Nov 2013 #15
retread Nov 2013 #16
gopiscrap Nov 2013 #23
Gravitycollapse Nov 2013 #18
LuvNewcastle Nov 2013 #19
ieoeja Nov 2013 #20
ChazII Nov 2013 #21
Zorra Nov 2013 #24
Jamaal510 Nov 2013 #25
gopiscrap Nov 2013 #29
ZombieHorde Nov 2013 #26
Orangepeel Nov 2013 #27
gopiscrap Nov 2013 #28
Orangepeel Nov 2013 #30

Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:42 PM

1. As much as Dick Cheney.

I rest my case.

eta: By that I mean, YES. Every adult citizen should be permitted to vote. Just because the law got you, it doesn't mean you are no longer a citizen who should have a say about our laws and government.

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:42 PM

2. War on drugs

Considering so many people have prison records because of the ignorant war on drugs, they should definitely be permitted to vote once released.

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:44 PM

3. What's interesting about this poll is do you imagine the people in jail to be guilty of crimes?

Or is it more "there but for luck go I?" I mean what is the difference between a criminal and a working class poor person? To some of our Republican Friends there's no real difference and therefore neither group should be encouraged to vote.

Bryant

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Response to el_bryanto (Reply #3)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:44 PM

4. good for you!

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Response to el_bryanto (Reply #3)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:51 PM

11. And I heard on a podcast that MANY people plead guilty

to a lesser charge because they know they are largely defenseless, even if they are completely innocent. They are overwhelmed and don't know how to maneuver around something like this, so they get scared and admit to anything to get through the whole ugly ordeal as quickly as possible.

Such a nightmare. There but for the grace of _________________ go I.

(Choose all that apply: God, fortune, luck, angels, karma, timing, ancestor intervention, family connections, wealth, cleverness, or who knows what)

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Response to tblue (Reply #11)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:55 PM

13. But that's the other side - how many people? If 95% of our criminals are convicted rightfully

than my answer might well be "let them vote after they've paid their dues." If 50% of our criminals are convicted rightfully (whether because they plead guilty to lesser charges or because they are breaking silly drug laws or for some other reason) than it makes more sense for them to keep their rights while in prison.

Bryant

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Response to tblue (Reply #11)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 06:46 PM

22. Very true especially in the federal system.

 

I think the statistic is about 98% of the cases never go to trial. Unless you are both completely innocent and very wealthy you do not stand a chance. Make a deal, take five years, or go to trial and risk 30. Think Aaron Swartz--that is the norm.

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:46 PM

5. Question: Should Republicans be allowed to disenfranchise all their political enemies

 

or just a few of them?

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:46 PM

6. Absolutely. Being convicted doesn't strip away your citizenship.

 

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Response to NuclearDem (Reply #6)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 05:21 PM

17. It does, however, strip away at least some of your civil rights.

 

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:46 PM

7. They should be able to vote while in jail since they are counted as part of apportionment census.

 

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Response to kelliekat44 (Reply #7)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:48 PM

9. yup

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Response to kelliekat44 (Reply #7)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:52 PM

12. There are already enough NIMBY problems with prisons and their surrounding communities, creating...

the prospect of town near a prison having their political landscape dominated by a bunch of prisoners is not going to help with that kind of a situation.

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:48 PM

8. Yes. they paid their debt to society and all rights should be restored.

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 04:49 PM

10. Depends on crime, sentence, and offices being elected. I don't have some kind of plan in mind,...

but convicted felons voting for or against judges who may still control the conditions of their ongoing service of their sentence doesn't sit well with me. Some guy who stole a car long ago voting for school board members doesn't bug me as much.

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 05:04 PM

14. I've never seen the connection between conviction/incarceration and

the denial of voting rights. People in prison should be allowed to vote absentee (or not vote, if they choose) for everything on the ballot in their home districts. And there should be careful oversight to ensure that their votes are not coerced or manipulated...

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 05:08 PM

15. Yes, once their debt to society is competely paid aka out of jail and off probation.

 

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 05:17 PM

16. Universal suffrage! Anything less is a pretence.

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Response to retread (Reply #16)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 07:03 PM

23. I totally agree

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 05:24 PM

18. Let's assume for a second that every convicted felon actually did what they were convicted of...

Which is obviously not remotely close to reality. But let's just assume for a moment it's true.

What kind of crimes constitute felonies? In my state of Arizona, the possession of ANY quantity of marijuana is a felony. I have pot in my room as I type this. Are you going to tell me there's a meaningful difference in responsibility or ethics between myself and the sorry sap who got sent to prison for pot?

Hell no. So let's up the crime. Let's increase the seriousness. You will find that along the way each crime possesses two bodies of people. Those who got away with it and those who did not. The ones who got away with it retain all of their rights and we as ignorant individuals, or even as informed individuals, would fight for their right to vote. But the second they're convicted all of a sudden they lose that right?

What is so inherently disturbing about a felony conviction that makes an individual unfit to vote? The electorate is composed of all sorts of people who have committed all sorts of crimes along the way and gotten away with it. Do we question their right to vote? No.

So the removal of voting rights due to a felony conviction necessarily becomes arbitrary. And that is something I could never support.

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 05:54 PM

19. Voting is a fundamental right and I don't believe it should

ever be taken away. Prisoners lose a lot of rights when they go to prison. The right to freedom, for instance, must necessarily be taken away when someone is convicted of felonies and some misdemeanors. There's no reason why inmates should have to give up their right to vote, however. The right to vote is sacred in a democratic republic and it's a simple matter to bring ballots and let the prisoners vote.

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 06:14 PM

20. To those voting "no" might I suggest you read the Declaration of Independance?

 


While generic Tyranny (and pure incompetence) is the #1 most cited reason, harsh law enforcement and punishment is the #2.

For a followup you should try the Bill of Rights. Four of the ten are specifically for people suspected, accused, arrested or convicted of a crime. Clearly this country was founded on the principle that criminals are still citizens.

Disclaimer: it does not, of course, matter. Our laws can, and have, been drastically altered many times in the past. I just wanted to point out that you've taken a position that is less socially progressive than a bunch of people who thought slavery was a necessary evil.


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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 06:26 PM

21. Yes, my son's godfather is in prison for murder

http://unsolvedmysteries.wikia.com/wiki/John_Mooney

He escaped but was caught after an episode of Unsolved Mystery aired. Strange to know someone for three years yet never suspect a secret past. He was a good husband and father. He is still in prison, btw.


He should be able to vote to answer the question.

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 07:12 PM

24. wonder how many American lost their right to vote because of marijuana related felonies

since 1965.

Probably at least a million.

Good post, thanks!

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 08:09 PM

25. Of course; the right to vote is guaranteed to all in the Constitution. nt

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Response to Jamaal510 (Reply #25)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 08:45 PM

29. yup, so that's why Idon't konw how they get away with it.

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 08:11 PM

26. Yes, but I would rather see Congress filled by sortition,

which is how democracies used to work.

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Response to gopiscrap (Original post)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 08:12 PM

27. of course. the only crime one should lose citizenship for is treason

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Response to Orangepeel (Reply #27)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 08:44 PM

28. this is about losing citizenship

it's about losing the right to vote......if you're native born, I don't think you can lose uour citizenship unless you renounce it. I might be wrong though. Anybody know?

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Response to gopiscrap (Reply #28)

Tue Nov 5, 2013, 09:28 PM

30. That was my point. Voting should be a fundamental right of citizenship.

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