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PumpkinAle

(1,210 posts)
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 01:33 PM Aug 2014

Scientists rediscover "noah" 6500-year-old-skeleton

Scientists at the Penn Museum in Philadelphia have re-discovered a rare and important find in their storage rooms – a complete human skeleton who lived around 6,500 years ago in the Sumerian city-state of Ur. The aptly named ‘Noah’ was originally found within a layer of deep silt, indicating that he lived after an epic flood. The first known recorded story of a great flood comes from Sumer, now southern Iraq, and it is generally believed to be the historic precursor of the Biblical flood story written millennia later.

.............. According to a news report in Past Horizons, the skeleton was originally found by British archaeologist Sir Leonard Woolley around 1929/1930 during a joint Penn Museum/British Museum excavation of the ancient city of Ur, near modern-day Nasiriyah in Iraq.

The skeleton was located at an incredible depth of 50 feet, in a deep silt layer beneath the city’s 4,500-year-old royal cemetery. Testing revealed that the layer was 2,000 years older than the cemetery, dating back to the Ubaid period (c. 5,500 to 4,000 BC). A total of 48 human remains were found in the layer, but ‘Noah’ was the only skeleton in good enough condition to be removed. In fact, Noah is the only complete skeleton ever recovered from this region and era.

....................... Some also believe it was the Sumerian account that later inspired the Biblical story of Noah’s Ark.

http://www.ancient-origins.net/news-history-archaeology/scientists-rediscover-noah-6500-year-old-skeleton-who-survived-great-flood

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Scientists rediscover "noah" 6500-year-old-skeleton (Original Post) PumpkinAle Aug 2014 OP
If the skeleton was found IN a layer of deep silt, MineralMan Aug 2014 #1
"Deep Silt" PeoViejo Aug 2014 #2
Yes, not really a well named skeleton. I think we can safely conclude this was *not* Noah. gtar100 Aug 2014 #5
Archaeologists often name a find after literary or historical Cleita Aug 2014 #8
Thank you. PumpkinAle Aug 2014 #19
But did they find any dinosaurs? malaise Aug 2014 #23
Or dinosaur saddles?? hifiguy Aug 2014 #24
Choking with laughter malaise Aug 2014 #25
Interesting. The article says he was buried in the silt after the flood. Autumn Aug 2014 #3
See my post #8. Cleita Aug 2014 #9
Yeah we know it's not Noah but they seem sure he lived through that particular flood Autumn Aug 2014 #12
Could be Noah - he could have hopped out of the boat csziggy Aug 2014 #21
It makes sense. The boat was rather tall I imagine. If he jumped out Autumn Aug 2014 #22
He could no longer outrun the Tyrannosaurus Rex on board aint_no_life_nowhere Aug 2014 #26
"a complete human skeleton who lived around 6,500 years ago" yortsed snacilbuper Aug 2014 #4
At no point linuxman Aug 2014 #7
Thank you for an interesting article. Cleita Aug 2014 #6
Shouldn't he be called Gilgamesh? Dirty Socialist Aug 2014 #10
That would be closer to the legend. Cleita Aug 2014 #13
Close, but the name you're looking for is Utnapishtim. cemaphonic Aug 2014 #16
It don't mean a thing if it ain't got that swing, and Utnapishtim's got no swing. Noah is better. Shrike47 Aug 2014 #27
Gil for short. hifiguy Aug 2014 #18
I'll be expecting "Scientists PROVE Noah lived !!" "They Find his body perfectly preserved " BlueJazz Aug 2014 #11
That makes him 500 years older than the world and creation itself. lunatica Aug 2014 #14
That's irony for you. Noah saved all of God's creatures from the flood. Then died from drowning. randome Aug 2014 #15
They sent the poor sap out for beer hifiguy Aug 2014 #17
Maybe he was the original brewmaster. Cleita Aug 2014 #20

MineralMan

(146,248 posts)
1. If the skeleton was found IN a layer of deep silt,
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 01:41 PM
Aug 2014

he probably died duringthe flood, rather than "lived after an epic flood." The Biblical Noah was described as living long after the flood. Bodies in deep layers of silt probably succumbed to the flood itself.

It is interesting, though, to find a 6500 year old skeleton, though.

Major flooding was not that uncommon in Sumeria.

Cleita

(75,480 posts)
8. Archaeologists often name a find after literary or historical
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 01:56 PM
Aug 2014

references fully knowing that's not them. For instance:

King Minos' palace.
Agamemnon's tomb
Helen's jewels

I could go on. They seriously know it wasn't Noah.

Autumn

(44,967 posts)
3. Interesting. The article says he was buried in the silt after the flood.
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 01:46 PM
Aug 2014

I wonder what it is about his remains being buried in the silt layer makes them so sure that he lived through it. .

Cleita

(75,480 posts)
9. See my post #8.
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 01:59 PM
Aug 2014

It's nothing more than a label for reference only. I'm pretty sure they knew the skeletons were buried in a flood or bog of some sort. It would require more study of that layer with our modern tools and methods, something not possible today in that war torn area and lack of funding for such expeditions these days.

Autumn

(44,967 posts)
12. Yeah we know it's not Noah but they seem sure he lived through that particular flood
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 02:06 PM
Aug 2014

and was buried in the silt. I was just wondering what made his gravesite different enough from others found in that layer to be sure he was buried. It is a shame that with all out technology we can't investigate these fascinating finds beacuse of wars that never seem to end.

csziggy

(34,131 posts)
21. Could be Noah - he could have hopped out of the boat
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 04:09 PM
Aug 2014

Once it ran ashore and he sunk to his death in the silt! Could have happened.

Autumn

(44,967 posts)
22. It makes sense. The boat was rather tall I imagine. If he jumped out
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 04:13 PM
Aug 2014

I can see how the fall in that soft mud could have buried him deep in that 10 foot layer. It stands to reason that a man would skip out on cleaning up the mess in that boat.

yortsed snacilbuper

(7,939 posts)
4. "a complete human skeleton who lived around 6,500 years ago"
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 01:48 PM
Aug 2014

Is this proof that the earth is only six thousand years old?

 

linuxman

(2,337 posts)
7. At no point
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 01:53 PM
Aug 2014

Did the article come even close to asserting that. Naming skeletons is tradition. The name fit, based off if a biblical story. Nobody is asserting it was actually THE Noah.

Cleita

(75,480 posts)
6. Thank you for an interesting article.
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 01:51 PM
Aug 2014

I wonder if that was the same dig that a young "Lawrence of Arabia", T.E. Lawrence, participated in?

Cleita

(75,480 posts)
13. That would be closer to the legend.
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 02:13 PM
Aug 2014

I think those archaeologists of that era wanted to appeal to the Anglican aristocracy who were probably funding their expedition. Gilgamesh would have been of little interest to those Lords.

cemaphonic

(4,138 posts)
16. Close, but the name you're looking for is Utnapishtim.
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 02:32 PM
Aug 2014

He was the flood survivor, Gilgamesh just heard the story (or part of it, anyway).

You're right that that version seems more appropriate, given the site location.

 

BlueJazz

(25,348 posts)
11. I'll be expecting "Scientists PROVE Noah lived !!" "They Find his body perfectly preserved "
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 02:02 PM
Aug 2014

Top Atheist admits> "How could we have been so wrong?"

 

randome

(34,845 posts)
15. That's irony for you. Noah saved all of God's creatures from the flood. Then died from drowning.
Sat Aug 23, 2014, 02:32 PM
Aug 2014

[hr][font color="blue"][center]"If you're bored then you're boring." -Harvey Danger[/center][/font][hr]

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