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Sun Aug 31, 2014, 10:48 AM

So the checker at the store asked "what kind of fruit is this?" ;-)


Today's story below.

Original post: How A Seed Saver (DU's own NRaleighLiberal) Discovered One Of Our Favorite Tomatoes : http://www.democraticunderground.com/10025319364


Remember the Amazon boycott! Powell's has NRaleighLiberal's upcoming "Epic Tomato" book available here: http://www.powells.com/biblio/62-9781612122083-0

Use this link first: http://ilwulocal5.com/ At no extra charge the union employees get paid FMLA, sick time, additional training like new automation, family emergency funds, college scholarships, etc.




Marta and I were at the store yesterday when he asked the question. I have a voice that carries. Several people got to hear the story on NPR about the Cherokee tomato. I went on about how the high acid level gives it more of the tomato taste everybody loves tomatoes for. I went on to mention I have a small connection to the guy in the story that is responsible for making this variety available to the world. And his book will be coming out in a couple months.

Several people went to the vegetable area and bought out what was left in stock of the Cherokees. There were not many of them in the heirloom section to begin with.

We can't have a garden here because all the animals that pass through our yard to graze. So I can't thank NRaleighLiberal enough for this wonderful favor he did for ALL tomato lovers as the Cherokee legend grows. His page: http://nctomatoman.weebly.com/nctomato-and-garden-blog

OS



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Arrow 52 replies Author Time Post
Reply So the checker at the store asked "what kind of fruit is this?" ;-) (Original post)
Omaha Steve Aug 2014 OP
Laelth Aug 2014 #1
Aerows Aug 2014 #28
monmouth3 Aug 2014 #2
VA_Jill Aug 2014 #39
monmouth3 Aug 2014 #40
NRaleighLiberal Aug 2014 #44
NRaleighLiberal Aug 2014 #3
grasswire Aug 2014 #8
NRaleighLiberal Aug 2014 #10
MADem Aug 2014 #17
malaise Aug 2014 #27
JimDandy Sep 2014 #46
Gormy Cuss Aug 2014 #18
a2liberal Aug 2014 #21
NRaleighLiberal Aug 2014 #22
a2liberal Aug 2014 #25
ctsnowman Sep 2014 #50
NRaleighLiberal Sep 2014 #51
Coventina Aug 2014 #4
procon Aug 2014 #5
mackerel Aug 2014 #11
alfredo Aug 2014 #15
R B Garr Aug 2014 #20
alfredo Aug 2014 #24
Aerows Aug 2014 #30
alfredo Aug 2014 #31
zeemike Aug 2014 #6
mountain grammy Aug 2014 #7
alfredo Aug 2014 #16
Auggie Aug 2014 #9
PatrickforO Aug 2014 #12
onethatcares Aug 2014 #13
R B Garr Aug 2014 #14
VA_Jill Aug 2014 #19
shraby Aug 2014 #26
VA_Jill Aug 2014 #38
shraby Sep 2014 #45
VA_Jill Sep 2014 #52
madokie Aug 2014 #33
Blue_In_AK Aug 2014 #23
eridani Aug 2014 #34
Blue_In_AK Aug 2014 #35
eridani Aug 2014 #37
Aerows Aug 2014 #29
madokie Aug 2014 #32
jillan Aug 2014 #36
edbermac Aug 2014 #41
Omaha Steve Aug 2014 #42
raven mad Aug 2014 #43
C Moon Sep 2014 #47
Enthusiast Sep 2014 #48
ColesCountyDem Sep 2014 #49

Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 10:51 AM

1. Excellent. Add cilantro to reduce the acidity but keep the taste. k&r n/t

-Laelth

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Response to Laelth (Reply #1)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 02:43 PM

28. :drool: worthy idea

 

I'll just sit back here and imagine how fine that would taste

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 10:53 AM

2. A Jersey Beefsteak tomato is my fav. Expensive here in FL..n/t

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Response to monmouth3 (Reply #2)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 06:14 PM

39. Ever had any

from Grainger County, TN? Best in the world, just about. Something about that red clay dirt and Tennessee sunshine….! They are working to make those as famous as Vidalia onions. Up here in VA we have the "Hanover tomato" and I promise you they are not a patch on the Grainger County ones Our local Rockingham County heirloom ones are lots better but still not quite there.

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Response to VA_Jill (Reply #39)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 06:17 PM

40. Somewhere I read that the popularity of the Jersey Beefsteak is due to the iron in the soil..n/t

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Response to monmouth3 (Reply #2)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 10:46 PM

44. I suspect it is also due to the particular varieties that they grow...and your

own personal tastes and memories of what you like. There are few absolutes with tomatoes - which makes it all so much fun!

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 11:04 AM

3. here's an interesting aside....

Pretty much all tomatoes - color, size, shape - have the same acidity (pH range extremely narrow)....the sensation of sweet or acid is entirely due to the genetics of the variety, combined with how it is grown (impact of the particular season, growing technique, etc). So the myth of the "low acid pink" or "high acid red" tomato is just that...a myth!

Fun stuff, hey!

By the way, the tomato on the cover is either Cherokee Green or Green Giant. If you've not tasted one of the green when ripe large fruited varieties, you are in for a treat - they are nearly all wonderful (and there aren't very many of them). The smaller greens, like Green Zebra and Green Grape, aren't favorites of mine (too tart or firm).

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #3)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 11:32 AM

8. have a cherokee green plant

How will I know when the green fruit is ready to eat?

Looking forward to it!

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Response to grasswire (Reply #8)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 11:36 AM

10. Cherokee Green is one of the green-when-ripes that develop yellow skin.

So look for a change to an amber color. Evergreen is another with such skin color; Aunt Ruby's Green and Green Giant have clear skin, making it more challenging (they turn to a softer green tone and get a faint pink blush on the bottom).

Let me know what you think of it!

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #3)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 01:14 PM

17. You are a DU TREASURE, you know!!!!! nt

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Response to MADem (Reply #17)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 02:42 PM

27. +1,000

He sure is a DU treasure

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Response to MADem (Reply #17)

Mon Sep 1, 2014, 01:14 AM

46. I'll say! n/t

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #3)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 01:16 PM

18. I'll have to try one of the large fruiting green varieties.

I'm with you on Green Zebra, just couldn't warm up to that one.

Eating a homegrown Cherokee Purple as I write this.

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #3)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 01:24 PM

21. Cam I get a recommendation?

I want to try growing an heirloom variety next season, preferably one that I can get pre-started plants for. Any recommendations for what would be good (and preferably likely to be available if you happen to know) in Michigan? Thanks!

Edit: ideally a low-maintenance/strong variety as I'm not actually good at gardening... I just water the plants and pick the fruits pretty much

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Response to a2liberal (Reply #21)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 01:29 PM

22. I have a friend who gardens in Augusta who has many heirloom varieties of seedlings available

And I am happy to ship plants as well - got a good way to do so.

So many good suggestions! Send me a DU mail.

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #22)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 02:11 PM

25. thanks! pm sent (n/t)

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Response to NRaleighLiberal (Reply #3)

Mon Sep 1, 2014, 10:00 AM

50. You

inspired my wife and I to grow tomatoes this year. Just the regular type so far.

Next year heirlooms.

Thanks NRaleighLiberal

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Response to ctsnowman (Reply #50)

Mon Sep 1, 2014, 10:06 AM

51. well, guilty as charged!

let me know anything at all I can do to help!

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 11:04 AM

4. You are so awesome!!

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 11:04 AM

5. Gorgeous!

Makes my mouth water. We have no farmers market here and I've never seen heirloom tomatoes in local store. My grandma grew tomatoes by the bushels, and she saved the seeds from year to year, storing them in mason jars down in the basement.

I remember one variety with a particolored skin that was streaked with pinky-red, green and orange that had a lighter, orangish color inside. Grandma didn't like those too much because they didn't have that deep red look of other tomatoes when canned. I've never had any luck growing tomatoes, but Grandma's pink tomatoes sure were delish to eat warm and juicy right out of the garden.

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Response to procon (Reply #5)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 11:49 AM

11. I found that those of food they have no luck with tomatoes do well with

Growing cherry tomatoes. try that you might surprise yourself

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Response to mackerel (Reply #11)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 01:12 PM

15. Cherry Tomatoes can make even brown thumb individuals think they are farmer brown.

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Response to alfredo (Reply #15)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 01:24 PM

20. They even have those hanging basket planters designed for tomatoes or

other produce so you can keep them off the ground or for horizontal space/limited space container gardening. I had one but gave it away before I used it so I don't know how good they are. It was only about $10. I'll see if I can find a picture.

It looked like a great idea for tomatoes/produce. Now I wish I hadn't given it away.

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Response to R B Garr (Reply #20)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 02:06 PM

24. Because I live in a townhouse, I have to container garden.

Jalapenos and herbs work well for me.

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Response to alfredo (Reply #15)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 02:47 PM

30. Believe it or not, if you seed them

 

You can make a kick ass salsa from them, or ... Yep, I've done it, pasta sauce. Tangy, warm and loaded with a unique flavor!

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Response to Aerows (Reply #30)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 02:50 PM

31. They are rather sweet.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 11:25 AM

6. That is a delicious looking tomato.

Look at how meaty it looks...would make a nice tomato sandwich.

Too bad people don't have access to more veggies like this...what you find in most stores is tasteless.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 11:31 AM

7. I'm a diehard tomato lover and heard a piece

Jim Hightower did about how fucking with tomatoes has robbed them of all flavor.
Nice post..... thanks.

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Response to mountain grammy (Reply #7)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 01:13 PM

16. They are bred for surviving machinery and for shelf life, not flavor or nutrition.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 11:34 AM

9. We grow Cherokee Purple in the backyard -- they're the best heirloom variety IMO.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 12:37 PM

12. Hmm. I wonder that Monsanto hasn't sued because they probably control a patent on a

Genetically modified version. Perhaps we could call it the "Cherokee AFTER the trail of tears Tomato."

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 12:50 PM

13. growing cherokee chocolate here

in zone 9/10 west central florida. If the tree rats would just stop eating the sprouts I would be one happy grower.

there is a tomato growers supply company in ft myers that has a great catalog of heirlooms.

this is my second year growing the cc, last year I only got about 10 off of three plants but they were great, raw, on blts,

in everything.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 12:52 PM

14. Really beautiful! I just love heirloom tomatoes.

They are like works of art and are so aptly named. Expensive, but worth it!

How fun that NRalieghLiberal raises them. I'll have to check out his blog.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 01:22 PM

19. Yum yum yum!

Where I live in VA there is a booming local-and-fresh movement and a great farmers' market. You can about imagine the tomatoes… Anyhow, there is one guy who has been working for several years to develop a Brandywine tomato that doesn't crack. He's down to one that cracks minimally, and they are still good.

My favorite summer sandwich, thanks to 35 years of living in east Tennessee, involves spreading 2 slices of bread with mayo (preferably JFG) and adding thick slices of fresh tomato, a little salt and pepper, and if I happen to have any, some purple basil leaves. Wash that all down with a glass of sweet tea. It just doesn't get any better……

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Response to VA_Jill (Reply #19)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 02:39 PM

26. Try toasting your bread first. Even better.

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Response to shraby (Reply #26)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 06:09 PM

38. Nope

That's for BLTs ONLY!

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Response to VA_Jill (Reply #38)

Mon Sep 1, 2014, 12:59 AM

45. I've been growing tomatoes for 50+ years and toasting the

bread keeps it from getting mushy when you eat a tomato sandwich. Also have you ever had a cucumber sandwich? Just plain bread with salad dressing..don't toast this one tho.

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Response to shraby (Reply #45)

Mon Sep 1, 2014, 11:14 AM

52. Actually

a good thick slice of homemade bread keeps it from getting mushy….or eating the sandwich fast enough….or a beefsteak tomato…or enough mayo. And yes to the cucumber sandwich, too.

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Response to VA_Jill (Reply #19)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 03:06 PM

33. Add a slice of commodity cheese and it is to die for

Commodities are what they call government hand out food to the poor around here. Yup I was raised on commodities

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 01:32 PM

23. Growing tomatoes is tricky here.

I have some in my greenhouse with lots of fruits, but they're still very green. They'll probably have to ripen off the vine in the house. My local grocer sells heirloom tomatoes sometimes, though. They're so delicious.

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Response to Blue_In_AK (Reply #23)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 03:37 PM

34. Same for the Pacific NW

My SIL on the Oregon coast will pick her first ripe tomato on Sept 1st. There are compensations, though. Yesterday we did U-Pick blueberries and I got a half gallon for $4.

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Response to eridani (Reply #34)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 03:51 PM

35. Our blueberry season is pretty much over

but it was probably a pretty good year with the rain. Do yours grow wild like ours or are they grown on farms?

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Response to Blue_In_AK (Reply #35)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 04:22 PM

37. Both. The farm was a small patch that the farmer's father had started jus afer WW II

Wild are available, but there is competition from bears and other critters.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 02:44 PM

29. NCRaleighLiberal

 

sent me some tomato plants, and they are so productive, I don't even know what to do with them all except gift them to neighbors and those that are needed.

His tomatoes ROCK .

He's a treasure to this world!

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 03:04 PM

32. I picked four Cherokee Purple tomatoes earlier this morning

Not as big as the ones we were getting at the start of the season but I'm sure they'll taste as good though
we really like the Lemon Boy and Carolina gold varieties too. I pretty much only plant indeterminate varieties as they produce all summer long. If I was to stretch some of our tomato vines out they'd be 15 feet long at least.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 04:20 PM

36. Drooling!!

All the ones we get in AZ are mushy.

I like my tomatoes firm.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 06:54 PM

41. High acid level?

That's bad for the oldsters like me.

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Response to edbermac (Reply #41)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 07:05 PM

42. I stand corrected above


It shows I NEED to buy the book.


NRaleighLiberal (35,074 posts)
3. here's an interesting aside....

Pretty much all tomatoes - color, size, shape - have the same acidity (pH range extremely narrow)....the sensation of sweet or acid is entirely due to the genetics of the variety, combined with how it is grown (impact of the particular season, growing technique, etc). So the myth of the "low acid pink" or "high acid red" tomato is just that...a myth!

Fun stuff, hey!

By the way, the tomato on the cover is either Cherokee Green or Green Giant. If you've not tasted one of the green when ripe large fruited varieties, you are in for a treat - they are nearly all wonderful (and there aren't very many of them). The smaller greens, like Green Zebra and Green Grape, aren't favorites of mine (too tart or firm).


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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 07:48 PM

43. Heirlooms are rarely available here, except home-grown.

Spouse and I have a small greenhouse; I have made a commitment to try and grow some starting next spring, if I can get seeds.

Too chilly already to even try to start right now! Had a bit of frost along with our earthquake last night - I so envy your fortune being able to get these super tasting babies!

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Mon Sep 1, 2014, 03:01 AM

47. I've been eating Trader Joes et al tomatoes for years and years....

my wife brought back some home grown tomatoes from her parent's yard, and I was floored at the flavor.
I could enjoy eating them the same as I eat an apple!

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Mon Sep 1, 2014, 07:23 AM

48. That is one wild looking tomato!

I want.

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Response to Omaha Steve (Original post)

Mon Sep 1, 2014, 07:57 AM

49. I grow heirloom tomatoes and also grow purple potatoes.

The first time I asked a friend if she would like some homegrown potatoes and gave her some purple ones, she asked, "What are these?".

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