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steve2470

(37,461 posts)
Sun Apr 23, 2017, 07:26 AM Apr 2017

Massive Iceberg Makes A Stop Off Newfoundland Coast

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/20/524833709/grounded-glacier-in-canada-reinforces-iceberg-alleys-moniker


An iceberg looms large off the coast of Newfoundland on Sunday.


Residents of the Canadian town of Ferryland, a small fishing village in Newfoundland, recently welcomed a new visitor: a huge iceberg that ran aground just offshore.

Watching icebergs is a Newfoundland tradition, and Ferryland bed-and-breakfast owner Maxine Dunne can see this iceberg outside her window. She tells NPR's David Greene that she and her husband, Charlie, have seen some pretty large icebergs over the years because they live along what is known as "iceberg alley," for the frequency with which icebergs float by after breaking off of glaciers on Greenland or in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

"But this is I would say certainly the highest iceberg that we've ever seen," she says. It's considered a "large" iceberg, which range between 150 feet and 246 feet above water, according to Scott Weese, a senior ice forecaster with the Meteorological Service of Canada.

Charlie, a crab fisherman, estimates it's about a half-mile from their house. In photos, the iceberg dwarfs the houses in town — and that's just what's visible. (Weese says it's hard to say just how big this iceberg is under the water because of its irregular shape.)
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Massive Iceberg Makes A Stop Off Newfoundland Coast (Original Post) steve2470 Apr 2017 OP
just goes to show, onethatcares Apr 2017 #1
Message auto-removed Name removed Apr 2017 #2
That has always been a place with a large count of bergs... Wounded Bear Apr 2017 #11
Quite a photo. democrank Apr 2017 #3
around nine times what you see above water Blues Heron Apr 2017 #4
Sad to see visual evidence of climate change. Dustlawyer Apr 2017 #5
Thats one big ice cube.... Historic NY Apr 2017 #6
My question is how can they harness this water? malaise Apr 2017 #7
Apparently, it has become a new tourist attraction. Buns_of_Fire Apr 2017 #8
do not show this to trump..he will think it is a carrier and order it to korea dembotoz Apr 2017 #9
Trivia: SCantiGOP Apr 2017 #10

onethatcares

(16,306 posts)
1. just goes to show,
Sun Apr 23, 2017, 07:34 AM
Apr 2017

if that much ice is in one place, global warming is a hoax.

(do I really need to add the tag?)

Response to steve2470 (Original post)

Wounded Bear

(59,044 posts)
11. That has always been a place with a large count of bergs...
Sun Apr 23, 2017, 11:12 AM
Apr 2017

they form in West Greenland and the current down the Davis Strait takes them south into the Atlantic shipping lanes.

Dustlawyer

(10,502 posts)
5. Sad to see visual evidence of climate change.
Sun Apr 23, 2017, 08:13 AM
Apr 2017

In my lifetime there may be an end to icebergs floating like this, they will be gone. What are we doing? We are playing with something we no little about. We do know we should do something, but that requires change, which costs money. Oil companies want to get every dime for every drop!

Oil companies should take a page from the coal companies book that just announced they are building a solar power plant in West VA.

SCantiGOP

(13,885 posts)
10. Trivia:
Sun Apr 23, 2017, 10:36 AM
Apr 2017

Newfoundland is the youngest part of Canada, voting in 1949 to leave "dominion"
status with the UK and join Canada.

I have a friend who retired there. He loves the people, even though he jokes about the unimaginative name (Let's call it 'new found land') and claims that some were in favor of Quebec independence because, if Quebec left Canada, it would then be 4 hours closer to Toronto.

He said seeing icebergs is no big deal up there, comparing it to Southerners who move up North and get excited the first few times it snows heavily.

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