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Thu Jun 3, 2021, 04:33 PM

F. Lee Bailey, defense lawyer for the famous and infamous, dies at 87

Source: Washington Post



F. Lee Bailey, one of the nation’s most storied criminal trial lawyers and a tenacious defender of O.J. Simpson, Patty Hearst and a host of other famous and infamous clients in a tumultuous career punctuated by his own collisions with the law and his eventual disbarment, died June 3 at a hospice center in the Atlanta area. He was 87. His son Bendrix Bailey confirmed the death but did not cite a specific cause.

Mr. Bailey was celebrated in some corners and scorned in others as he represented a broad swath of deeply unpopular suspects ranging from mutilation murderers and international drug lords to get-rich-quick-scheme artists. In the courtroom, he fascinated the public with his cool, pointed oratory and prodigious memory as well as his relentlessness. He avidly sought the limelight — even appearing in a Smirnoff vodka ad — and in his give-no-quarter advocacy for his clients, he rarely acknowledged defeat. Steven Brill, founder of Court TV and American Lawyer magazine, once called him “an enduring legal figure in the sense that he’s been willing, and in fact relished, taking on clients that were the demons of society.”

A former private investigator, Mr. Bailey was regarded as a master of pretrial preparation — meeting with key witnesses, collecting pictures and documents and visiting locations relevant to the crime. The purpose, he said, was to “stuff my head with enough facts for when the action starts.” Mr. Bailey could question witnesses for hours without notes and was likened by colleagues to such superstar 20th-century courtroom advocates as Clarence Darrow, Edward Bennett Williams and Percy Foreman, who defended James Earl Ray following the assassination of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. The jury was not the only audience Mr. Bailey played to. He championed his clients in an almost constant barrage of commentary to reporters and appearances on “The Tonight Show,” “The Mike Douglas Show” and other television talk programs.

“Massachusetts just burned another witch,” he growled to reporters after a jury in 1967 rejected an insanity plea on behalf of sexual assault defendant Albert DeSalvo. DeSalvo separately had confessed to Mr. Bailey to being the widely feared “Boston Strangler” sought in the killing of 13 women in the early 1960s. Mr. Bailey adroitly excluded the confession from court, then unsuccessfully challenged what he contended was the state’s antiquated definition of criminal insanity in DeSalvo’s unrelated sexual assault case.

Read more: https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/f-lee-bailey-dead/2021/06/03/9d765474-5c37-11e3-95c2-13623eb2b0e1_story.html



Blast from the past....

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Reply F. Lee Bailey, defense lawyer for the famous and infamous, dies at 87 (Original post)
BumRushDaShow Jun 2021 OP
hlthe2b Jun 2021 #1
yaesu Jun 2021 #2
Bo Zarts Jun 2021 #3
generalbetrayus Jun 2021 #4
AZLD4Candidate Jun 2021 #5
Escurumbele Jun 2021 #6
billh58 Jun 2021 #7
The Wizard Jun 2021 #8
JI7 Jun 2021 #9
BumRushDaShow Jun 2021 #10
Mazeltov Cocktail Jun 2021 #11
tavernier Jun 2021 #12
TexasBushwhacker Jun 2021 #13
tavernier Jun 2021 #14
TexasBushwhacker Jun 2021 #15
BradAllison Jun 2021 #16

Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Jun 3, 2021, 04:58 PM

1. The one case for which I give him great credit was the case which inspired TV's "The Fugitive"

In the 1960s, Bailey, at the time a resident of Rocky River, Ohio, was hired by Sheppard's brother Stephen to help in Sheppard's appeal. In 1966, Bailey successfully argued before the U.S. Supreme Court that Sheppard had been denied due process, winning a re-trial. A not guilty verdict followed.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sam_Sheppard

Years after Sheppard's death, DNA finally exonerated him:
https://www.nytimes.com/1998/03/05/us/dna-test-absolves-sam-sheppard-of-murder-lawyer-says.html


Most of his other cases, not so much.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Jun 3, 2021, 05:28 PM

2. My uncle, who was an aeronautical engineer, worked for Bailey at a helicopter plant he co owned

many decades ago. My uncle found out that Bailey bought some crap healthcare insurance to save money when he needed a bypass & the insurance wouldn't pay for it. Bailey was on his shit list ever since. My uncle was a marine in WWII & survived Iwo Jima. I spent a summer vacation helping him build an float plane back in the 70's. Him & my aunt had a big, beautiful house on their own private lake & I loved to visit, fish, explore. My aunt was an RN so between the 2 of them they made a pretty good living.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Jun 3, 2021, 07:02 PM

3. Nil mortui dire nisi bonum .. but

There was the court martial of Captain Ernest Medina for the My Lai Massacre ..

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Jun 3, 2021, 07:08 PM

4. Alan Dershowitz would have been my first choice from what's left of the dream team for dying.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Jun 3, 2021, 07:21 PM

5. Like him or hate him, he was Darrow's heir apparent. A fabulous attorney.

If you are on trial for your life and even if you are guilty as sin, this is the type of attorney you want representing you in court.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Jun 3, 2021, 07:33 PM

6. As a lawyer he was fantastic.

I remember during the OJ trial that I told my wife "any kid who watches this guy will want to be a lawyer."

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Jun 3, 2021, 10:36 PM

7. Little known fact, but

F. Lee Bailey helped to found PATCO, the air traffic controllers' union whose members were ultimately fired by Raygun for going on strike in 1981.

PATCO was founded in 1968 with the assistance of attorney and pilot F. Lee Bailey. On July 3, 1968, PATCO announced "Operation Air Safety" in which all members were ordered to adhere strictly to the established separation standards for aircraft. The resultant large delay of air traffic was the first of many official and unofficial "slowdowns" that PATCO would initiate.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Professional_Air_Traffic_Controllers_Organization_(1968)


I had the distinct honor to briefly meet Mr. Bailey when I was working in Honolulu Tower and he visited us as he was waiting to board a flight.

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Thu Jun 3, 2021, 11:41 PM

8. Some question

his legal acuity .

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jun 4, 2021, 02:24 AM

9. Are all of the OJ lawyers Dead now ?

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Response to JI7 (Reply #9)

Fri Jun 4, 2021, 05:42 AM

10. Well one "infamous" one was 45's lawyer during impeachment #1

so no...

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Response to JI7 (Reply #9)

Fri Jun 4, 2021, 05:46 PM

11. And the "Legal Zoom" one...

Can't or won't remember his name...

Remember Lily Tomlin's "Flea Bailey, call for Mr Flea Bailey..."

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Response to BumRushDaShow (Original post)

Fri Jun 4, 2021, 09:51 PM

12. I wonder if it ever bothered him

that his client slit the throats of two people and got off scot free.

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Response to tavernier (Reply #12)

Sat Jun 5, 2021, 11:38 AM

13. It was the prosecution's case to lose

And lose it they did. The spontaneous and boneheaded decision to have OJ put on the leather gloves, which had been soaked in blood and shrunk, was all OJ's defense team needed to establish reasonable doubt. Add to that Judge Ito allowing it to be televised and letting the trial to run for 143 days (!) didn't help the prosecutions case.

You may not always like the outcome, but all accused people deserve a vigorous defense. OJ was able to afford the best.

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Response to TexasBushwhacker (Reply #13)

Sat Jun 5, 2021, 12:30 PM

14. Yes, I understand all of that.

But that doesn’t answer my question.

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Response to tavernier (Reply #14)

Sat Jun 5, 2021, 12:57 PM

15. I doubt it bothered him in the least

If you're a defense attorney, you have to be aware that some of your clients are guilty of their crimes. I have more of a problem with win-no-matter-what DAs who put poor, innocent people in prison and pursue the death penalty because it's good for them politically.

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Response to TexasBushwhacker (Reply #13)

Mon Jun 7, 2021, 06:25 PM

16. OJ was a celebrity being tried in LA

He had also ingratiated himself deeply into the world of rich white people.

That's why he got off.

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