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Sat Jan 6, 2018, 05:36 PM

First Space Shuttle Launch - worth seeing

Godspeed, John Young, commander of the first Space Shuttle flight.


9 replies, 1242 views

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Reply First Space Shuttle Launch - worth seeing (Original post)
Xipe Totec Jan 2018 OP
skydive forever Jan 2018 #1
Xipe Totec Jan 2018 #4
apkhgp Jan 2018 #8
LastLiberal in PalmSprings Jan 2018 #2
burrowowl Jan 2018 #3
turbinetree Jan 2018 #5
pressbox69 Jan 2018 #6
SergeStorms Jan 2018 #7
lillypaddle Jan 2018 #9

Response to Xipe Totec (Original post)

Sat Jan 6, 2018, 06:49 PM

1. My lovely lady

Worked hands on on every single Solid Rocket Booster for the entire Shuttle program as a technician. That's where I met her. I did the same job on the SRBs for 25 years. What an honor it was. We met so many cool and famous people out there at the cape. Job wise we were definitely blessed.

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Response to skydive forever (Reply #1)

Sat Jan 6, 2018, 10:04 PM

4. I worked on Entry to Landing Navigation

My glory days as well.

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Response to skydive forever (Reply #1)

Sun Jan 7, 2018, 06:29 PM

8. I wish I could have been there with both of you guys

These were turning points in the history of the space program.


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Response to Xipe Totec (Original post)

Sat Jan 6, 2018, 07:15 PM

2. Here's the pilot's view of the landing, narrated by Young and Crippen

https://www.airspacemag.com/videos/category/space-exploration/sts-1-the-first-shuttle-landing/

I doubt there will ever be a space plane to match the shuttle. I got to watch it launch and land (at Edwards) and it was one of the highlights of my life.

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Response to Xipe Totec (Original post)

Sat Jan 6, 2018, 08:49 PM

3. I remember watching both launch and landing

at a friend's house in Paris. What pride and what wonder, landing was one hell of a glide.

and

RIP Commander Young

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Response to Xipe Totec (Original post)

Sun Jan 7, 2018, 12:11 AM

5. I worked on the final assembly for Shuttle out in Palmdale at Air Force Plant 42

before moving over to another project.................

God Speed John Young.....................

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Response to Xipe Totec (Original post)

Sun Jan 7, 2018, 01:22 AM

6. I remember watching the return.

My company set up a TV set in the conference room.I stood at the back of the room but felt it was pretty much like watching an airplane land. One of the companies vice presidents, a former male model who was a dead ringer for Ted Baxter but perhaps even more oblivious to the real world, stood directly in front of the TV with arms folded making loud cartoon noises like oooooh and ahhhhh while shaking his head like a child at a magic show. Hilarious.

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Response to Xipe Totec (Original post)

Sun Jan 7, 2018, 04:02 AM

7. I was fortunate enough....

to have been born in 1950, and I was able to watch the United States Space Program (in it's original iteration) from it's infancy, to it's demise. From Sputnik to the Space Shuttle, the "Space Race" always intrigued me, as it did most of the nation. I remember how everyone freaked out about Sputnik, with it's steady "beep, beep, beep". We all gathered in the yard at night to witness what we thought would be certain death from above. Those Ruskies had beaten us to the punch, and the fear (from what, we didn't really know) was palpable. It enveloped us like a cloak of star-dust. We knew life on Earth would never be the same again.

I have so many fond memories from NASA's heyday. There are way too many to chronicle here, but I have them in my mind, in a special compartment, and no one can take those away. Needless to say my first trip to Cape Kennedy (they changed it back to Canaveral in '73) was like a pilgrimage to the holy land. I've been there fifteen times since. To stand in the Block House on launch pad LC-5, where Alan Shepard became the first American in Space is awe inspiring. The ashtrays on the consoles are still holding the cigarette butts from the day's launch. 'Kent' cigarettes, I remembered, as if it was something important I'd need to know later.

OK, I won't bore anyone further.

RIP John Young. You were a big part of the early NASA triumphs, and will be remembered forever as a steely-eyed Missile Man.

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Response to Xipe Totec (Original post)

Sun Jan 7, 2018, 07:23 PM

9. Absolutely amazing

Those were the days, eh?

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