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backtoblue

(11,341 posts)
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 05:58 PM Apr 2019

Got some very interesting family DNA results: Updated

Last edited Tue Apr 30, 2019, 11:46 AM - Edit history (1)

My little sister bought a DNA kit for my grandmother recently.

She has always told us that her grandmother was full blooded Cherokee. All of her siblings have believed the same.

Turns out there is no trace of native american.

There is however...2% middle eastern.

This is awesome because my grandma is the Fox-aholic who sits on the couch and repeats all the racist crap that she hears.

Her reaction was complete and total shock. She got on her iPad and started looking at maps of the region. Her whole demeanor has changed! It's amazing to witness this transformation.

There's still hope for hearts that carry hate. I swear it feels like a ton of weight has been lifted from my family now. Completely different environment in her house!





.........
Update: Some of my grandmother's siblings say there used to be rumors that their grandmother was a Syrian immigrant who pretended to be Cherokee. (Possibily to hide from racism)

I know the test could be wrong but the coincidence is just amazing and almost poetic in irony.

New life adventures are freaking awesome! Thank you all for going down the rabbit hole with me this past year. I hope I'm not driving everyone nuts with my obsessive posting lately.






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Got some very interesting family DNA results: Updated (Original Post) backtoblue Apr 2019 OP
If she's been judging Elizabeth Warren, this might change how she feels about her, too. femmedem Apr 2019 #1
+ 1000 chia Apr 2019 #2
Oh absolutely! backtoblue Apr 2019 #3
+1 Kurt V. Apr 2019 #50
Is this her grandmother on her father's side? Apollo Zeus Apr 2019 #4
That's interesting backtoblue Apr 2019 #6
one of my relatives just did 23andMe Apollo Zeus Apr 2019 #16
Will watch in a bit backtoblue Apr 2019 #18
I forgot to say welcome to DU!! backtoblue Apr 2019 #15
Does this mean that your DNA results are only from the maternal side? Merlot Apr 2019 #20
No this is women don't get anything at all from a large section of their father's Y chromosome Apollo Zeus Apr 2019 #24
Got it, and thanks for the link. Merlot Apr 2019 #33
I'm female rusty fender May 2019 #58
she gets an X chromosome from dad tho eShirl Apr 2019 #42
welcome to DU gopiscrap Apr 2019 #46
EXACTLY the same thing Brainstormy Apr 2019 #5
I'm thinking about doing one myself backtoblue Apr 2019 #9
You pays your money and you takes your chances Brainstormy Apr 2019 #44
We've believed for some time barbtries Apr 2019 #30
An Osage friend of mine nocoincidences Apr 2019 #7
I live literally on the edge of the Mescalero Apache reservation MosheFeingold Apr 2019 #11
Especially Southerners seem to claim some Cherokee csziggy Apr 2019 #34
Similar story with my sister's kids. PoindexterOglethorpe Apr 2019 #8
My sister's results showed 1% Papuan... backtoblue Apr 2019 #12
There's alot of redheaded Paupauans!(per google images) skamaria Apr 2019 #48
Lol backtoblue Apr 2019 #49
I won't swear my math skills are great, but I remember figuring out that 3% NA catrose Apr 2019 #25
Middle Eastern MosheFeingold Apr 2019 #10
Probably backtoblue Apr 2019 #13
Love This Mollyann Apr 2019 #14
Ive wondered if the reaction is common backtoblue Apr 2019 #17
"Be careful of who you hate, because it might be somebody you love" GeoWilliam750 Apr 2019 #21
Mine showed 1% ashkenazi jewish, then they updated it and it no longer showed that. nt chowder66 Apr 2019 #19
Ditto for me DonaldsRump Apr 2019 #29
I've waffled a bit about doing it but it actually became extremely important that I did take it. chowder66 Apr 2019 #35
Mine, via my sister, was no surprise but I have a "new" cousin! QED Apr 2019 #22
The truth is that we are all basically cousins vlyons Apr 2019 #23
Families believe the family legends. More people are realizing that blm Apr 2019 #26
Yes. We were told fables by our parents, who believed them as much as we did MaryMagdaline Apr 2019 #31
we had the same results about the Cherokee Heritage..it made sense tho...my moms family is from samnsara Apr 2019 #27
Just had a conversation with my mom backtoblue Apr 2019 #43
Does this mean SilasSouleII Apr 2019 #28
I would say yes backtoblue Apr 2019 #32
That's great that she's accepting of the results & changing. As for the NA missing... WePurrsevere Apr 2019 #36
This, exactly this Boomer Apr 2019 #47
That's great that you did that! Please don't give up hope... WePurrsevere Apr 2019 #55
Weren't some Native American groups thought to descend from a lost tribe of Israel? JustABozoOnThisBus Apr 2019 #37
Wassup cuz! backtoblue Apr 2019 #41
Well, if it matters, she'll probably get a different result from a different DNA testing company. progressoid Apr 2019 #38
Do they send it automatically? backtoblue Apr 2019 #40
Same for me with Ancestry Cicada Apr 2019 #39
You're not gonna believe this coincidence... backtoblue Apr 2019 #45
We could be cousins. nolabear Apr 2019 #57
Oh, that's too funny! But why does someone have to BE something, to know... Honeycombe8 Apr 2019 #51
Lucky you! onlyadream Apr 2019 #52
I understand your enthusiam. I first started tracing my ancestry before there were many on-line Fla Dem Apr 2019 #53
I'm not so sure about these tests' reliability backtoblue Apr 2019 #54
I'm sure they aren't 100% accurate, but pretty close. Fla Dem Apr 2019 #56
That's really something. PatrickforO May 2019 #59

femmedem

(8,195 posts)
1. If she's been judging Elizabeth Warren, this might change how she feels about her, too.
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 06:01 PM
Apr 2019

Congratulations on having your family member back!

backtoblue

(11,341 posts)
3. Oh absolutely!
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 06:12 PM
Apr 2019

That was one of the first conversations we had afterwards.

We have argued over Warren so many times that I gave up trying to get through to her. It's very hard to love someone so much but despise their beliefs.

The hard look in her eyes is a little bit softer.

She's still not the sweet, cookie-making grandmother, but this is a HUGE step for her.



Apollo Zeus

(251 posts)
4. Is this her grandmother on her father's side?
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 06:22 PM
Apr 2019

CW is that we get half of our genetic info from each parent but it doesn't really work that way. A woman can't get any of the genetic info / influence that is on the Y chromosome. And the further back you go the greater the number of relatives whose genetics lost out in all the pairings.

Apollo Zeus

(251 posts)
16. one of my relatives just did 23andMe
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 07:38 PM
Apr 2019

and there were no surprises. It was kind of a let down.

Mapping the human genome has prompted some interesting new theories:

backtoblue

(11,341 posts)
18. Will watch in a bit
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 07:46 PM
Apr 2019

The desire to be "superior" vs the desire to "belong". Then there's the desire to be unique.

Maybe one day people can stop using their blood links as an excuse to hate each other. We're all cousins.

Merlot

(9,696 posts)
20. Does this mean that your DNA results are only from the maternal side?
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 07:55 PM
Apr 2019

there are stories about people who find out their fathers aren't actually their biological fathers. Does it take more than one siblings DNA to come to that conclusion?

For example, if you were told your father was German but there was no German in your DNA, he could still be your father?

Apollo Zeus

(251 posts)
24. No this is women don't get anything at all from a large section of their father's Y chromosome
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 08:24 PM
Apr 2019

so there may be less influence from the father's side.

>>if you were told your father was German but there was no German in your DNA, he could still be your father?

Absolutely yes. Two reasons: 1) tying DNA to modern european geographical boundaries is dubious, and 2) if he passed only DNA that does not get id'd by 23andMe as "Germanic" then they would say 'no German.'

If we think of genetic recombination as being like 23 coin flips with only one gene winning each one then we see why sibilings tend to average around 50% genetic overlap.

>>the chromosomes in cells line up in pairs and exchange bits of genetic material before forming an egg or sperm cell. Each mature egg and sperm then has its own specific combination of genes—which means offspring will inherit a slightly different set of DNA from each parent.<<

From (good overview and answers why sibliings get different results): https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2018/03/dna-ancestry-test-siblings-different-results-genetics-science/

Merlot

(9,696 posts)
33. Got it, and thanks for the link.
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 09:10 PM
Apr 2019

There is a missing link in my family tree - my maternal grandfather. I've thought of taking the DNA test to see if I could get a clue about his origins. I would also not be surprised if there was "unexpected" results in my paternal side.

 

rusty fender

(3,428 posts)
58. I'm female
Thu May 2, 2019, 06:57 PM
May 2019

and my brother and I have very close dna pairings, not identical, but very close. So Did we get roughly equal parts dna from both parents

Brainstormy

(2,380 posts)
5. EXACTLY the same thing
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 06:22 PM
Apr 2019

happened in my family. My sister had always claimed that our grandmother claimed Native American blood. My husband's family always said that his maternal great grandmother was half Cherokee. Neither my kids' nor my own DNA results showed a shred of Native American ancestry. I did turn up a half brother who turned out to be a dick, but his kids seem nice, so there's that.

backtoblue

(11,341 posts)
9. I'm thinking about doing one myself
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 06:38 PM
Apr 2019

I was firmly against giving my DNA to strangers before. Honestly, I still don't trust that DNA won't be used for nefarious reasons some day.

My sister had hers done first and so their information has been connected together. I figure since they already put it out there that our family line is now in a database. I'll eventually be traced anyways...

Brainstormy

(2,380 posts)
44. You pays your money and you takes your chances
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 11:25 AM
Apr 2019

there's a risk, as was my case, of turning up some complicated and not entirely happy stuff in the family tree. But I don't worry about the DNA any more than I worry about blood type or fingerprints. I don't intend to do anything that will hold up under appeal.

barbtries

(28,752 posts)
30. We've believed for some time
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 08:51 PM
Apr 2019

that my older brother and sister (different biological father) were part Cherokee. Their DNA suggests otherwise. HOWEVER, I still believe they have indigenous blood though it may not be Cherokee after all. My (their) grandmother told me herself that she spent part of her childhood at a reservation in Salinas, CA. A quick google search revealed that there were local CA tribes in that area. So what it looks like now is that my brother and sister are part native Americans, whose DNA has not yet been mapped.

The science of DNA is still evolving. Ancestry.com initially reported to me that my DNA indicated a connection to Scandinavian areas of the globe, highlighting Finland on the map. But I knew my maternal grandmother was Swedish. It was sort of discombobulating. Then Ancestry.com updated their algorithm, the database grew, and they sent my updated results. 27% Swedish.

with Helix, the DNA project associated with National Geographic, I learned that I am part Neanderthal, so that was cool. Otherwise no real surprises and disappointingly completely white.

nocoincidences

(2,213 posts)
7. An Osage friend of mine
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 06:28 PM
Apr 2019

told me White People always seem to claim some Cherokee blood.

NA people hear it all the time.

MosheFeingold

(3,051 posts)
11. I live literally on the edge of the Mescalero Apache reservation
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 06:48 PM
Apr 2019

My neighbor says he knows someone is telling the truth when they admit Comanche, because the Comanche were apparently assholes to everyone (especially Apache) and no one voluntarily admits to it.

csziggy

(34,131 posts)
34. Especially Southerners seem to claim some Cherokee
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 09:44 PM
Apr 2019

Considering how the early whites treated the Cherokee, maybe it is some kind of "white man's burden" thing.

Some of my Mom's cousins claimed that they came from a Cherokee great grandmother but that myth was not passed down in Mom's family. When Mom's DNA was tested she showed no Native American at all - but both my sister and I do. So now we're trying to figure out if Dad's side might have had NA ancestry - if there was it had to be way back during the 1600s or 1700s since the family tree has been well documented pretty much back that far other than the lines that came from England and Wales in the 1800s.

PoindexterOglethorpe

(25,806 posts)
8. Similar story with my sister's kids.
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 06:30 PM
Apr 2019

Their father always said there was a Cherokee grandmother or great grandmother. DNA test shows no such thing. The father still swears there really is the Cherokee ancestor.

All four of my grandparents came from Ireland and the only interesting thing from my DNA test is a tiny amount of Sardinian DNA.

backtoblue

(11,341 posts)
12. My sister's results showed 1% Papuan...
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 06:51 PM
Apr 2019

That didn't show up in Grandma's.

My sister is so white she glows in the dark and her hair is ridiculously light blond. The remainder of both their DNA is Irish and English.

That was interesting too because Papua is a small tribal island. From what we read, Irish criminals were shipped Australia. Papua is right there so we think thats the link between the two.

I like to imagine that my Irish ancestor fell in love with a Papuan and had some kids. My gut believes that it was probably a forced relationship...

Edit to add:. Holy moly my sister is an alien.

https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-26/dna-of-extinct-human-species-pacific-islanders-analysis-suggests/7968950

skamaria

(327 posts)
48. There's alot of redheaded Paupauans!(per google images)
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 02:30 PM
Apr 2019

Those Irish lads must have been very busy boys!

backtoblue

(11,341 posts)
49. Lol
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 02:47 PM
Apr 2019

I learned about the sent-Irish-troublemakers-to-Australia from a wine bottle. LMAO

19 Crimes

My family tree didn't throw it's apples very far


It sounded better to just say "we read it somewhere".
Better than "I thought the wine bottle instructions all said...Drink me" who knew?

catrose

(5,058 posts)
25. I won't swear my math skills are great, but I remember figuring out that 3% NA
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 08:26 PM
Apr 2019

meant something like a full-blood great-grandparent. My DNA showed 3% NA, but my son showed none. So it doesn't take that many generations to wipe out a heritage. I'm also 3% Jewish, but my son has none.

MosheFeingold

(3,051 posts)
10. Middle Eastern
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 06:46 PM
Apr 2019

Hate to break it to you, but unless you are a very recent immigrant, odds are you are still part of a Tribe.

Shalom.

Mollyann

(108 posts)
14. Love This
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 07:17 PM
Apr 2019

My husband always thought he had NA in his line. His DNA test did not show any NA ancestry, but this man from "one drop" Mississippi found he was 4 to 6 percent subsaharan African. It has made him a better person, but still won't tell his Trumper son ( my stepson). Both of our sons think it is cool and would love for their half sibling to find out.

backtoblue

(11,341 posts)
17. Ive wondered if the reaction is common
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 07:41 PM
Apr 2019

Someone goes their whole life hating a group of people for whatever stupid reason. Then to find out that they are actually part of that same group.

I wonder if anyone ever gets their results back and go "Damn, I hate myself!"

DonaldsRump

(7,715 posts)
29. Ditto for me
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 08:48 PM
Apr 2019

I told everyone about having a small percentage of Ashkenazi Jewish DNA, and then 23 and Me changed the results to remove it. They literally had it down to a specific great x 6-grandparent, and then changed the result. That tells me a lot about the accuracy of results of tests like this.

I'm pretty dubious about the accuracy of this. I'm also concerned about the privacy issues with these tests. In some ways, I regret doing it.

chowder66

(9,043 posts)
35. I've waffled a bit about doing it but it actually became extremely important that I did take it.
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 10:00 PM
Apr 2019

It knocked out some doubt about a family member. I needed to know this more than I did anything else.
And yet It also has led me to verify some genealogy lines I've been working on for years but wasn't sure if I was on the right path.

I think assessing the dna and linking members can be tricky so I view the DNA make up with slight caution because they are always reassessing it as more and more people submit their samples. Also, I think they use the trees of others to see where they say someone is from but the DNA may prove otherwise so it's the tree that is incorrect or the story the ancestor passed down, saying where they were from, that is incorrect or something along those lines.



QED

(2,747 posts)
22. Mine, via my sister, was no surprise but I have a "new" cousin!
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 08:01 PM
Apr 2019

He found out that who he thought was an aunt was really his mom - I'm not sure how all the rest came about but, he's been welcomed into the fold. The cool thing is that he's gay and progressive - in a family that is mostly evangelical and Trump loving. But he's loved and accepted and someone I can commiserate with about IQ45. And he loves dogs. Am I lucky or what?

vlyons

(10,252 posts)
23. The truth is that we are all basically cousins
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 08:07 PM
Apr 2019

Our DNA is so close that we homo sapiens are all basically cousins. Humans have been moving around this old planet exchanging DNA for 10s of thousands of years, including a little Neanderthal in out heritage. Except for south Africans, whose ancestors never left Africa. No matter our color, language, culture, or country of origen, we are all 100% plug compatible.

blm

(112,985 posts)
26. Families believe the family legends. More people are realizing that
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 08:33 PM
Apr 2019

their stories are not so different from Elizabeth Warren’s family experience.

MaryMagdaline

(6,849 posts)
31. Yes. We were told fables by our parents, who believed them as much as we did
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 08:53 PM
Apr 2019

(Speaking of my family in particular).

samnsara

(17,597 posts)
27. we had the same results about the Cherokee Heritage..it made sense tho...my moms family is from
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 08:34 PM
Apr 2019

..Oklahoma. WOW your grams family were..... immigrants! GASP.




Congrats on the good news.

backtoblue

(11,341 posts)
43. Just had a conversation with my mom
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 11:20 AM
Apr 2019

She was talking to one of her uncles (Grandma's brother). He said there were always rumors that their grandmother was from Syria and she pretended to be Cherokee. She never signed up with the tribe, even though she was dirt poor. Never made sense before because she would've gotten help if she did sign up.

This mystery is pretty darn amazing to think about.

A possible scenario:

Syrian immigrant comes to the US and pretends to be NA...Why? to fit in? to escape prejudice?

It's astonishing to see the irony in this.



SilasSouleII

(359 posts)
28. Does this mean
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 08:41 PM
Apr 2019

She's "Woke"?... Seriously, would this be an instance of a good use of this term? It's new to me but maybe just new in general.

backtoblue

(11,341 posts)
32. I would say yes
Mon Apr 29, 2019, 08:58 PM
Apr 2019

As far as having an experience that changes your learned belief system, I think so.

I hope it sticks whatever it is!

WePurrsevere

(24,259 posts)
36. That's great that she's accepting of the results & changing. As for the NA missing...
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 05:41 AM
Apr 2019

There's still a chance that there were NA ancestors, they're not showing up in one's DNA.

First of all the ethnicity part of a DNA test isn't a perfect science yet. The DNA matches are but not the ethnicity.

Second the more distantly you're related the less likely it is that you will still have shared DNA. For instance... 10% of 3rd cousins won't share DNA, 50% of 4th cousins won't and it just increases from there. It doesn't mean you're not 'blood' related, it just means that the DNA part hasn't been shared with one of you.

Third... The amount of NAs who have tested is very low because they simply don't trust that their DNA won't be abused in some way.

There's more info on NA DNA results here:
http://www.rootsandrecombinantdna.com/2015/03/native-american-dna-is-just-not-that.html

Here's a good read on ethnicity's challenges...
https://www.legalgenealogist.com/2019/01/27/and-still-not-soup/

Source for percentages I used...
https://thednageek.com/the-limits-of-predicting-relationships-using-dna/

Sorry for the ramble. The DNA companies pushing ethnicity like it's really accurate annoys me a bit since it fuels confusion and detracts from the far more accurate science of DNA for finding 'lost' family (which is what I did as an adoptee) and solving crimes.

Boomer

(4,167 posts)
47. This, exactly this
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 02:08 PM
Apr 2019

>> The DNA companies pushing ethnicity like it's really accurate annoys me a bit since it fuels confusion and detracts from the far more accurate science of DNA for finding 'lost' family (which is what I did as an adoptee) and solving crimes. <<

I view the Ethnic breakdowns as entertaining fluff (even though my own results pretty much fell in line with my family tree and family stories). The real value is in determining genetic ties to specific individuals, which can help confirm family trees and find lost relatives.

My motivation for getting DNA tests was the long-time expectation that I have some unknown half-siblings out there somewhere. My father was nearly 50 when he married my mother, and there's a few decades of wandering around time before I came on the scene. So far, however, no one has shown up. And given my age, I'm losing hope that any half-siblings would still be alive.

WePurrsevere

(24,259 posts)
55. That's great that you did that! Please don't give up hope...
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 09:15 PM
Apr 2019

Even if you don't find any half sibs your DNA being out there might very well help others find their missing puzzle pieces.

It was only because some of my natural family members tested that I found them (sadly my parents are both deceased but I knew at my age, late 50s, the odds weren't great that I'd find them alive still). Now my daughter and I try to use what we've learned to help others occasionally find their missing puzzle pieces.

So far my tree on Ancestry doesn't reflect my ethnicity results (on any of the DNA testing sites I'm on) but it's close and some of the areas that don't mesh ATM might just be beyond one of my darn genealogical 'walls'. As I learn even more about genetic genealogy hopefully I'll be able to break those down eventually. Meanwhile I'm just enjoying the learning and journey.

JustABozoOnThisBus

(23,314 posts)
37. Weren't some Native American groups thought to descend from a lost tribe of Israel?
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 06:40 AM
Apr 2019

There are alternative theories to the "Siberian-Alaska land bridge" nonsense.

Your grandmother: living proof.



Doesn't our DNA show that we are all "out of Africa"? Howdy, cuz!

Cicada

(4,533 posts)
39. Same for me with Ancestry
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 09:09 AM
Apr 2019

I wish my mother were alive so I could ask her about what she told me, that her grandfather was full blood Choctaw. She told me he died at 86 with jet black hair. These errors about native heritage come mainly from Cherokee claims. Cherokee lived in the confederate south east mainly. My mom grew up in Mississippi. I have a theory about why apparently false claims seem almost always about Cherokees . Why is Unce Bob so dark skinned? Why Uncle Bob’s momma was a Cherokee princess honey.Seriously these questionable claims are almost always Cherokees, living in the heart of the old confederacy.My moms brother was in the ku klux klan. His grandfather being”Choctaw” might have been an excuse for his dark skin.

backtoblue

(11,341 posts)
45. You're not gonna believe this coincidence...
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 11:28 AM
Apr 2019

There were rumors that her grandmother was a Syrian immigrant pretending to be NA. Possibly to avoid prejudice just like your family member.

My imagination is going crazy thinking about this revelation.

nolabear

(41,925 posts)
57. We could be cousins.
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 11:13 PM
Apr 2019

My great great grandmother was reputed to be Mississippi Choctaw. My father’s and grandmother’s generation have first hand stories of her practicing root medicine on them and “talking the fire out of a burn,” a surprisingly common claim. She was supposed to pass her knowledge down to my great uncle but he turned Pentecostal and rejected her skills as being from the devil. I know all this first hand.

My DNA test shows no NA blood but that grandmother’s father is the only person in my line that we can find no genealogical record of. It remains an interesting mystery.

Honeycombe8

(37,648 posts)
51. Oh, that's too funny! But why does someone have to BE something, to know...
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 05:39 PM
Apr 2019

to know how it feels to be in their shoes? Lack of empathy?

onlyadream

(2,161 posts)
52. Lucky you!
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 05:55 PM
Apr 2019

Maybe I should get a DNA test for my Trump loving, Fox 'News' watching mother. But I think we'll only see Eastern European, but you never know.

Fla Dem

(23,528 posts)
53. I understand your enthusiam. I first started tracing my ancestry before there were many on-line
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 06:03 PM
Apr 2019

Last edited Thu May 2, 2019, 10:06 AM - Edit history (2)

records. Like your grandmother, my maternal grandmother swore we have Native American ancestry. After 30 years of research and DNA tests from Ancestry.com and 23 & me, not a drop of NA ancestry. Kind of glad my Grandmother's not with us anymore, she would have been so disappointed.

Still working on my ancestry though. It's never ending. Did a great job on my maternal grandmother's, mother's family lineage, but keep hitting brick walls on her father's lineage. Every few years new records go on line and I get a little further.

Good luck!

backtoblue

(11,341 posts)
54. I'm not so sure about these tests' reliability
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 07:56 PM
Apr 2019

My sister's said she has 1% Papuan. After some digging there is no way that's possible.

The Papuans are one of, if not the most reclusive group of people on earth. Their DNA has been found to have very distinctive markers that suggest a third group of humans.

The idea of such an exclusive DNA group actually scares me a little. I'm going to research some more.

It would be astonishing if true, but i think this one is too far of a stretch. She's going to retake the test and see what happens.


As for my grandmother, we're going to let her believe that she is Syrian no matter what. Too good of a change in her to take it away.



Fla Dem

(23,528 posts)
56. I'm sure they aren't 100% accurate, but pretty close.
Tue Apr 30, 2019, 09:42 PM
Apr 2019

Captured my family heritage pretty much on point and both were statistically similar.

PatrickforO

(14,549 posts)
59. That's really something.
Thu May 2, 2019, 10:40 PM
May 2019

Quite the irony.

And, I've climbed that old family tree as well. Written two small books about a branch of my family and its first two generations here in the United States.

Funny, when I really got serious and pulled old census reports, it felt for a time as if I knew my ancestors personally, as if they were alive. I could almost see their shades around me as I wrote.

Good for you!

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