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Fri Apr 7, 2017, 07:01 PM

can someone explain mi car insurance rules?

so i lent a car to a friend, and he got rear-ended.
it seems that there is something called no-fault, and mini-torts.

other driver admitted fault. and fault was clear. it was a chain reaction.

now progressive says that this person didnt even have the mini-tort insurance. so i cant even get the piddly $1k without suing.

how the heck can this be right?

eta- this is a vintage vehicle that was in near mint condition. it isnt now. it's worth half what it was when it left town. i doubt they would give me what the loss of value would be. but jesus, nothing?

11 replies, 7295 views

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Arrow 11 replies Author Time Post
Reply can someone explain mi car insurance rules? (Original post)
mopinko Apr 2017 OP
MichMan Apr 2017 #1
mopinko Apr 2017 #2
MichMan Apr 2017 #11
mopinko Apr 2017 #3
MichMan Apr 2017 #6
safeinOhio Apr 2017 #4
MichMan Apr 2017 #8
mopinko Apr 2017 #9
VMA131Marine Apr 2017 #5
mopinko Apr 2017 #7
MichMan Apr 2017 #10

Response to mopinko (Original post)

Fri Apr 7, 2017, 08:03 PM

1. You insure your own car regardless of who was at fault

Did you have collision coverage on your car? If you do, your insurance should pay, if not, you are pretty much out of luck.

Michigan "no fault" insurance means that your insurance is responsible for fixing your car and the other person's fixes theirs. Doesn't matter who was at fault.

You can attempt to sue the other driver in small claims for the amount of your deductible and other expenses (up to 1K), but that may end up being hard to collect.

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Response to MichMan (Reply #1)

Fri Apr 7, 2017, 08:19 PM

2. that's insane.

i dont have collision. i just have liability, in excess of illinois law.
how the heck can this apply to people who dont live in mi?

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Response to mopinko (Reply #2)

Fri Apr 7, 2017, 09:41 PM

11. Only your insurance co could tell you nm


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Response to MichMan (Reply #1)

Fri Apr 7, 2017, 08:19 PM

3. is this a recent thing?

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Response to mopinko (Reply #3)

Fri Apr 7, 2017, 09:12 PM

6. Not sure how it works if you are out of state

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Response to mopinko (Original post)

Fri Apr 7, 2017, 08:40 PM

4. I recall when Michigan voted for that law.

We were told we would have the cheapest rates in the nation. Michigan is now the highest.

With older cars, I have few, I now go with limited collision insurance. Much cheaper than regular collision. If you are in an accident and it is not your fault, you are covered. If your fault, it pays for the other car but not yours. I find it saves me money and makes me more careful while driving.

Now, don't get me started on what we pay in Michigan for plates and registration.....now called the "Birthday Tax".
This is the DU member formerly known as safeinOhio.

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Response to safeinOhio (Reply #4)

Fri Apr 7, 2017, 09:25 PM

8. It is expensive here

It is expensive, but mainly because of unlimited lifetime medical coverage being mandatory. Any medical claims from accidents go against the car insurance, not your regular medical. The doctors and hospitals know this, so they charge higher amounts than they would otherwise. As much as costs have skyrocketed, it is very difficult for insurance companies to determine what the costs of future unlimited lifetime care will cost.

The original idea was sound; instead of having lawyers trying to prove fault to sue the other driver, your insurance would pay for your car damages and vise versa. It was intended to reduce litigation.

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Response to MichMan (Reply #8)

Fri Apr 7, 2017, 09:27 PM

9. i'm sure, but

wtf if you arent from michigan?
not sure i will be setting foot in your state any time soon.

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Response to mopinko (Original post)

Fri Apr 7, 2017, 08:46 PM

5. If you dont carry collision or comprehensive

you are basically saying that you are self-insuring the vehicle. This is not a wise thing to do unless you are independently wealthy or the car isnít worth very much. Your only recourse in this case is to sue the other driver for the damage they caused.

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Response to VMA131Marine (Reply #5)

Fri Apr 7, 2017, 09:13 PM

7. well, i already replaced the vehicle, but

in illinois, and the rest of the civilized world that i know of, if you damage someone else's property, you pay.

i guess i will end up suing. but jeebus. there was no question about the fault. how the heck does the idea that you are not at fault for your own actions become the law? and the law that holds people who arent citizens of your state to abide by a totally different set of rules.

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Response to VMA131Marine (Reply #5)

Fri Apr 7, 2017, 09:32 PM

10. Diminishing returns

As cars age, the premiums generally do not decrease. Once a car gets around 8 yrs old you really have to decide if it is worth paying a few hundred a year extra for collision.

I drive a 10 yr old car with high miles. If it was totaled, I might get $2K, so it isn't worth it to me to still carry collision. I keep comprehensive because it is pretty cheap and covers deer crashes which can be a risk around here.

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