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Thu Apr 30, 2020, 08:44 AM

Sea Surface Temps, No El Nino - Every Indicator Pointing To Busy Hurricane Season

EDIT

1. Warm ocean temperatures

Hurricanes thrive on warm sea surface temperatures. Warmer oceans evaporate water into the air, giving storms energy and moisture to intensify. (High up in hurricane thunderstorms, evaporated water vapor condenses into both liquid and ice particles, releasing energy that hurricanes convert to strong winds).

"The ocean surface in the Atlantic is pretty warm right now," noted Judt. So unless these waters are stirred up and cooled off, perhaps by the region's strong trade winds, the oceans are more likely to fuel vigorous storms. "With warmer surface temperatures, there's a greater tendency for stronger storms," said Judt. The Atlantic, however, isn't the only ocean that's relatively warm right now. The above-average temperatures in many oceans around the globe are a global warming signal, Judt noted. The seas soak up over 90 percent of the amassing heat humans trap on Earth, resulting in relentlessly warming oceans.

EDIT

In the Atlantic Ocean basin this year, the University of Arizona expects 19 storms and 10 hurricanes, Accuweather predicts 14 to 18 storms and seven to nine hurricanes, and Penn State University's best forecast is for 20 storms. The Penn State prediction, updated on Monday, is largely driven by the same two primary factors mentioned above. There is "anomalous warmth" in the area where many Atlantic hurricanes form and unfavorable conditions for hurricane-shredding, El Niño-induced winds in the Caribbean, explained Michael Mann, director of the Earth System Science Center at Penn State University.

"There is no question that the main factor driving this forecast — extreme warmth in the tropical Atlantic — is favored by human-caused climate change," said Mann. Recent research shows warmer oceans have played a dominant role in stoking potent Atlantic hurricanes. Obviously, 2020 is a terrible year for hurricanes to strike land — or, at least, have boosted odds of striking land. The historic coronavirus pandemic leaves emergency and disaster relief overtaxed and threatened with exposure to a pernicious pathogen that has no treatments or vaccines.

EDIT

https://mashable.com/article/hurricane-season-2020-forecast-prediction/

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Reply Sea Surface Temps, No El Nino - Every Indicator Pointing To Busy Hurricane Season (Original post)
hatrack Apr 30 OP
captain queeg Apr 30 #1
lark Apr 30 #2

Response to hatrack (Original post)

Thu Apr 30, 2020, 08:51 AM

1. If the disease is airborne storms might increase the spread

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Response to hatrack (Original post)

Thu Apr 30, 2020, 09:10 AM

2. Fuck, just what we don't need during a time of mounting deaths.

We have barely even turned the line on the charts, deaths and infections from CV19 are still going up, not down and this fucking asshole is trying to kill us for personal profit and to keep his ugly flabby huge ass out of jail.

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