HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Health » Health (Group) » Compound in Mediterranean...

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 09:37 AM

Compound in Mediterranean diet turns cancer cells into normal cells:)

Parsley, celery and chamomile tea are the most common sources of apigenin, but it is found in many fruits and vegetables.

The researchers also showed in this work that apigenin binds with an estimated 160 proteins in the human body, suggesting that other nutrients linked to health benefits – called “nutraceuticals” – might have similar far-reaching effects. In contrast, most pharmaceutical drugs target a single molecule.

“We know we need to eat healthfully, but in most cases we don’t know the actual mechanistic reasons for why we need to do that,” said Andrea Doseff, associate professor of internal medicine and molecular genetics at Ohio State and a co-lead author of the study. “We see here that the beneficial effect on health is attributed to this dietary nutrient affecting many proteins. In its relationship with a set of specific proteins, apigenin re-establishes the normal profile in cancer cells. We think this can have great value clinically as a potential cancer-prevention strategy.”

Doseff oversaw this work with co-lead author Erich Grotewold, professor of molecular genetics and director of Ohio State’s Center for Applied Plant Sciences (CAPS). The two collaborate on studying the genomics of apigenin and other flavonoids, a family of plant compounds that are believed to prevent disease.
http://researchnews.osu.edu/archive/apigenin.htm

13 replies, 2611 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 13 replies Author Time Post
Reply Compound in Mediterranean diet turns cancer cells into normal cells:) (Original post)
BethMomDem Oct 2013 OP
dkf Oct 2013 #1
regnaD kciN Oct 2013 #3
StrayKat Oct 2013 #4
Moliere Oct 2013 #5
whathehell Oct 2013 #6
DetlefK Oct 2013 #2
BethMomDem Oct 2013 #12
kestrel91316 Oct 2013 #7
Silent3 Oct 2013 #8
postulater Oct 2013 #9
FiveGoodMen Oct 2013 #11
eppur_se_muova Oct 2013 #10
DirkGently Oct 2013 #13

Response to BethMomDem (Original post)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 09:44 AM

1. Parsley, celery and chamomile are in the Mediterranean diet?

 

All I know is I love using Celery and parsley in my juicer.

I'm partial to the following recipe: 1 1/2 apples, 3 stalks celery, 1/4 inch ginger, 1/2 lime, bunch of kale, spinach, chard, and parsley. Yum.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dkf (Reply #1)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 10:04 AM

3. Parsley, yes, but celery…?

When I lived in Europe as a child, celery was utterly unknown -- including in the Mediterranean countries. Fennel was used instead. Celery as an ingredient in cooking was considered to be an "American" affectation.



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to regnaD kciN (Reply #3)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 10:19 AM

4. Yes, Europeans seem kind of averse to celery.

Last edited Thu Oct 24, 2013, 11:15 AM - Edit history (1)

Apparently, celery allergy is fairly common in Europe and the EU requires it to be listed on foods like peanuts in the US.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to regnaD kciN (Reply #3)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 10:41 AM

5. That's odd

...because celery is one of the three ingredients in mirepoix which dates pretty far back, and celery is actually based on the French word céleri. Plus I've been eating and cooking french cuisine for 40 years and celery has always been a part of the foundation. Where in France were you? Alsace-Lorraine maybe?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirepoix_%28cuisine%29
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celery

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to regnaD kciN (Reply #3)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 11:00 AM

6. " an American "affectation"?

Perhaps the word you want is "custom", as "affectation" means something on the order of

"putting on airs" and I can't imagine anyone using celery for that purpose.

http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/affectation?s=t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BethMomDem (Original post)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 10:04 AM

2. Garlic kills 100% of cancer, but only in petri-dish-cultures.

And you don't get garlic-juice intravenous. You mix it with saliva, then you digest it, then you transfer the result through a membrane into your blood, then you transfer that through another membrane in cells.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DetlefK (Reply #2)

Fri Oct 25, 2013, 12:00 AM

12. Exactly, it gets into cells BEING THE MAIN POINT:)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BethMomDem (Original post)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 11:48 AM

7. Yay for parsley. I only use celery as an ingredient in certain recipes, cooked.

 

Just can't deal with it raw (except for the sweet heart). And I HATE chamomile tea.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BethMomDem (Original post)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 01:00 PM

8. How many Mediterraneans do I have to eat to get the full effect? n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Silent3 (Reply #8)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 01:11 PM

9. A Brazillion, of course. Surprised you didn't know that.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to postulater (Reply #9)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 01:55 PM

11. Does the Brazillion have to eat a Mediterranean first?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BethMomDem (Original post)

Thu Oct 24, 2013, 01:35 PM

10. Saved by taboulli ! nt

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to BethMomDem (Original post)

Fri Oct 25, 2013, 07:59 PM

13. Interesting. N/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread