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Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:08 PM

I learned something new today: Holodomor Genocide.. -

...I never heard of this before today. Evidently Joseph Stalin deliberately starved 3 to 10 million people on purpose in order to destroy Ukraine Resistance to his rule.
..I was doing some research on large numbers of deaths like 9/11..Tokyo Tsunami of a few years ago, and other horrific natural events, and I came across .."Holodomor Genocide.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holodomor

So I learned something new today...In addition to all the other news, I learned some history I did not know about. I guess that is good, but this information is something I would rather not know.

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:19 PM

1. I always felt Stalin intended the result. Others might say it was incidental to collectivization.

Either way, Stalin was a butcher. It has been said that he killed more of his own people than any other leader in history. The famine is Exhibit "A" in that argument.

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Response to John1956PA (Reply #1)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:24 PM

2. Stalin was also totally unprepared for the invasion by Hitler..He refused to believe the infomration

that was given to him about Hitler preparing to invade. He thought he had made a deal with Hitler, and that Hitler was going to keep his word. I read that the German's got within a few miles from Moscow. Stalin was a butcher just as you said. What an awful person.

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Response to Stuart G (Reply #2)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:28 PM

3. When Hitler launched Operation Barbarossa, they were still receiving raw materials from the USSR.

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Response to Stuart G (Reply #2)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:34 PM

4. I remember this 1930s cartoon from one of my college humanities/history courses.

?

The September 30, 1939, invasion of Poland by those two countries was beyond horrific. My father would tell me that he was jubilant when Hitler turned on the USSR in June 1941. As you say, Hitler's army made a powerful push. However, the broad expanse of the terrain and the steadfastness of the Soviet soldiers wore down the German army.


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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:37 PM

5. Putin: His Downfall and Russia's Coming Crash

Read it a few months ago and learned about Holodomor - had never heard of it

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 08:57 PM

6. Russia's had a long history of conflict & pain. Before the Holodomor

was the Russian Famine of 1921-22. The photograph images of the time are shocking, beware.

The famine came at the end of six and a half years of unrest and violence (first World War I, then the two Russian revolutions of 1917, then the Russian Civil War). Many different political and military factions were involved in those events, and most of them have been accused by their enemies of having contributed to, or even bearing sole responsibility for, the famine. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_famine_of_1921%E2%80%9322

List of Famines, Worldwide https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_famines

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Response to Stuart G (Original post)

Mon Mar 30, 2020, 10:40 PM

7. In 2000

I had a Ukrainian exchange student living with me. She made sure I knew about that.

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