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Mon Nov 6, 2017, 02:32 AM

"Most scientists now reject the idea that the first Americans came by land"

Tiny little baby steps away from the colonizers' self-serving narrative that "we're all immigrants."

Most scientists now reject the idea that the first Americans came by land
Researchers embrace the kelp highway hypothesis in “a dramatic intellectual turnabout.”

Annalee Newitz, Ars Technica 11/4/2017

It's been one of the most contentious debates in anthropology, and now scientists are saying it's pretty much over. A group of prominent anthropologists have done an overview of the scientific literature and declare in Science magazine that the "Clovis first" hypothesis of the peopling of the Americas is dead.

For decades, students were taught that the first people in the Americas were a group called the Clovis who walked over the Bering land bridge about 13,500 years ago. They arrived (so the narrative goes) via an ice-free corridor between glaciers in North America. But evidence has been piling up since the 1980s of human campsites in North and South America that date back much earlier than 13,500 years. At sites ranging from Oregon in the US to Monte Verde in Chile, evidence of human habitation goes back as far as 18,000 years.

In the 2000s, overwhelming evidence suggested that a pre-Clovis group had come to the Americans before there was an ice-free passage connecting Beringia to the Americas. As Smithsonian anthropologist Torben C. Rick and his colleagues put it, "In a dramatic intellectual turnabout, most archaeologists and other scholars now believe that the earliest Americans followed Pacific Rim shorelines from northeast Asia to Beringia and the Americas."

Now scholars are supporting the "kelp highway hypothesis," which holds that people reached the Americas when glaciers withdrew from the coasts of the Pacific Northwest 17,000 years ago, creating "a possible dispersal corridor rich in aquatic and terrestrial resources."


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Reply "Most scientists now reject the idea that the first Americans came by land" (Original post)
Mike__M Nov 2017 OP
democratisphere Nov 2017 #1
Rhiannon12866 Nov 2017 #2
SunSeeker Nov 2017 #3
pansypoo53219 Nov 2017 #4
Lucky Luciano Nov 2017 #5
Ghost Dog Feb 2018 #7
needledriver Nov 2017 #6
MosheFeingold May 2018 #8

Response to Mike__M (Original post)

Mon Nov 6, 2017, 02:53 AM

1. Makes sense.

Thanks for sharing Mike__M.

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Response to Mike__M (Original post)

Mon Nov 6, 2017, 03:56 AM

2. Fascinating find! Thanks for posting!

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Response to Mike__M (Original post)

Mon Nov 6, 2017, 05:12 AM

3. Interesting. Polynesian settlers made it to the Americas as well.

Polynesians made it to the Solomon Islands 30,000 years ago. They were amazing navigators.

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Response to Mike__M (Original post)

Mon Nov 6, 2017, 05:27 AM

4. i never bought that land bridge thing.

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Response to pansypoo53219 (Reply #4)

Mon Nov 6, 2017, 09:36 AM

5. I don't think the land bridge is disputed.

What is disputed is who were the first people to come to Tge Americas. The land bridge people might have been a second wave.

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Response to Lucky Luciano (Reply #5)

Fri Feb 16, 2018, 08:58 AM

7. Coastal people, fishers and shellfish

gatherers, small bands of nomadic explorers with boats... These people were able to adapt to and take advantage of the climate change at the end of the last glacial period. Fragile sophisticated societies like today's, not so much.

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Response to Mike__M (Original post)

Mon Nov 6, 2017, 11:43 AM

6. OK, sounds reasonable.

 

How does this negate the colonizers’ self serving narrative that “we’re all immigrants.”?

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Response to needledriver (Reply #6)

Wed May 23, 2018, 03:33 PM

8. I'm not sure it affects it in any way

There was an earlier group that was subsumed into (or killed/out bred by) a later (Clovis) group, who are what are now called Native Americans.

Doesn't have a lot to do with the Spanish conquest (followed by everyone else's conquest).

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