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Wed Mar 6, 2013, 06:57 AM

Native American Woman and Baby (1590), Theodor deBry , 1528-1598

http://dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/ref/collection/debry/id/37


This double portrait depicts a woman carrying a baby on her back. They are standing in front of a coastal scene in which several canoes are visible.



http://www.lib.unc.edu/dc/debry/

http://dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/search/collection/debry

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Reply Native American Woman and Baby (1590), Theodor deBry , 1528-1598 (Original post)
littlemissmartypants Mar 2013 OP
Xipe Totec Mar 2013 #1
aquart Mar 2013 #3
aquart Mar 2013 #2
littlemissmartypants Mar 2013 #4
aquart Mar 2013 #5
littlemissmartypants Mar 2013 #6

Response to littlemissmartypants (Original post)

Wed Mar 6, 2013, 07:05 AM

1. By the physiognomy, I would say the painter has never seen a native American

and is going by verbal accounts.

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Response to Xipe Totec (Reply #1)

Wed Mar 6, 2013, 07:20 AM

3. Yep. You called it.

Theodorus de Bry (1528 – 27 March 1598) was an engraver, goldsmith and editor who traveled around Europe, starting from the city of Liège in the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (where he was born and grew up), then to Strasbourg, Antwerp, London and Frankfurt, where he settled.

Theodorus de Bry created a large number of engraved illustrations for his books. Most of his books were based on first-hand observations by explorers, even if De Bry himself, acting as a recorder of information, never visited the Americas. To modern eyes, many of the illustrations seem formal but detailed.Theodorus de Bry (1528 – 27 March 1598) was an engraver, goldsmith and editor who traveled around Europe, starting from the city of Liège in the Prince-Bishopric of Liège (where he was born and grew up), then to Strasbourg, Antwerp, London and Frankfurt, where he settled.

Theodorus de Bry created a large number of engraved illustrations for his books. Most of his books were based on first-hand observations by explorers, even if De Bry himself, acting as a recorder of information, never visited the Americas. To modern eyes, many of the illustrations seem formal but detailed.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theodor_de_Bry

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Response to littlemissmartypants (Original post)

Wed Mar 6, 2013, 07:16 AM

2. Holy fucking shit.

Fringed woven cloth and blondes. 1590?

Very pale, bare-breasted women who might reasonably be expected to have heavy tans.

Anyone care to explain wtf this is?

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Response to aquart (Reply #2)

Wed Mar 6, 2013, 07:34 AM

4. Men drawing women they have never seen. . .

History.

Happy Women's History Month.

Love, Peace and Shelter. lmsp

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Response to littlemissmartypants (Reply #4)

Wed Mar 6, 2013, 07:54 AM

5. Eh. He was trying.

Actually, it's fascinating the way and how much he got wrong.

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Response to aquart (Reply #5)

Wed Mar 6, 2013, 07:56 AM

6. I do think it is beautiful. eom

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