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Fri Aug 5, 2016, 05:04 PM

On the prevalence and "normalcy" of indoctrinating children in religion



A nice summary of the common defenses I see to religious indoctrination of children, a practice so widespread that many see it as completely normal.

19 replies, 1611 views

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Response to MellowDem (Original post)

Fri Aug 5, 2016, 05:11 PM

1. I was indoctrinated into the slavemasters religion. Didn't take with me.

 

Too many lies. Religion has been going on since the caves. Of course it is normal. As is atheism. I don't like people pushing religion on me, I also don't appreciate people trying to otherize religious people. I prefer to work on getting religion out of politics and shit but have no issues with personal beliefs or systems of belief. Why should I? I don't believe it so pfftt, it's bullshit and always will be. I have not bothered to teach my kids about religion but my youngest swears she is a christian.

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Response to bravenak (Reply #1)

Fri Aug 5, 2016, 06:58 PM

4. +1

 

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Response to MellowDem (Original post)

Fri Aug 5, 2016, 05:28 PM

2. Parents mean well

So that's why it's accepted. I think school should teach alternatives so that they could be free to make up their own minds. I think that would meet with major opposition by the indoctrinators.

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Response to MellowDem (Original post)

Fri Aug 5, 2016, 05:37 PM

3. One word of warning

Studies have shown one very strong common trait among members of hard-core cults - the type where members surrender all their worldly possessions to the group. The trait is that they were never exposed to religion as a child. Then, in their late teens, as they are trying to understand who they are and where they fit in the cosmos, they discover a mystical philosophy that has an answer to every question and welcomes them into a loving family.
I was lucky I guess. I had Catholicism crammed down by throat by the nuns and had given up religion for good by the time I was 16.

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Response to MellowDem (Original post)

Fri Aug 5, 2016, 07:59 PM

5. Humanistischer Verband Deutschlands

 



Jugendfeier am 29. März 1959 in der Niedersachsenhalle in Hannover

The HVD is a provider of humanist and non-religious ceremonies in many regions,[1] and maintains more than three dozen Kindergartens in Berlin, Nuremberg, Fürth, Regensburg, Hanover and Braunschweig. It runs a humanistic primary school in Fürth,[2] and a second school is set to open its doors in Munich soon. In Berlin, the HVD is responsible for the optional school subject Humanistische Lebenskunde, with about 54,000 participants in 2013. The HVD supports a youth organization Junge Humanistinnen & Humanisten in Deutschland (JuHu).

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Response to rug (Reply #5)

Fri Aug 5, 2016, 08:03 PM

6. Any organization that uses abuse or coercion...

to convince children of beliefs is in the wrong. Religion seems to be where it is most normalized.

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Response to MellowDem (Reply #6)

Fri Aug 5, 2016, 08:08 PM

7. Religion is simply the most prevalent.

 

The video way oversimplifies and skews the phenomenon. Ironically, because it itself is pushing a predigested viewpoint. Propaganda is a millimeter apart from indoctrination.

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Response to rug (Reply #7)

Fri Aug 5, 2016, 09:40 PM

8. "Predigested viewpoint"

You mean a thought out opinion? Weird doublespeak. What is ironic about that?

How does it oversimplify and skew the "phenomena" of religious indoctrination?

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Response to MellowDem (Reply #8)

Fri Aug 5, 2016, 09:51 PM

9. Let me see . . . totalitarian party = religion.

 

Religious belief lacks critical thinking.

6:50 - 8:55. Children taught religion will be abducted and nailed to a shed.

"Predigested viewpoint" is a generous description.

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Response to rug (Reply #9)

Fri Aug 5, 2016, 10:00 PM

10. Not seeing any of that in the video...

The political party analogy was to show how society would think that is wrong, but doesn't for religion. It's showing a double standard. The child abduction story was specifically refuting how just because parents believe they are doing what's best, doesn't mean it's moral or right, not implying children taught religion will be nailed to a shed. You're being more than intentionally obtuse.

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Response to MellowDem (Reply #10)

Sun Aug 7, 2016, 12:29 PM

11. "you're being more than intentionally obtuse."

Bingo.

When defending religion from criticism, anything goes.

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Response to cleanhippie (Reply #11)

Sun Aug 7, 2016, 03:16 PM

14. I think you know as much about criticism by critical thinking as you do about religion.

 

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Response to MellowDem (Reply #10)

Sun Aug 7, 2016, 03:15 PM

13. I know what it purports to say but it's really stretching to support it.

 

Watch it again, maybe this time with some critical thinking.

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Response to MellowDem (Original post)

Sun Aug 7, 2016, 01:38 PM

12. Quelle horreur!

A man, coming from Jerusalem towards Jericho, fell among thieves, who robbed and wounded him and left him for dead. And a priest came along the same road and, seeing him, passed by. And also a deacon on the road, when he saw him, passed by. But a Samaritan, coming by, saw him, and took pity; bound and dressed his wounds; and carried him to a hostel and nursed him. And the next day, he paid the innkeeper, saying, Take care of him, and whatever it more costs I will repay you, when I return. Who of these three, do you think, was neighbor to that man who fell among the thieves?

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #12)

Sun Aug 7, 2016, 03:42 PM

15. moot question

seeing as how it is made up bullshit.

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Response to Cartoonist (Reply #15)

Sun Aug 7, 2016, 06:59 PM

16. You are, of course, free to choose the view that acts of mercy, towards those needing our help,

is just "made-up bullshit"

But I think that it from this single point that I must choose not to be moved

My dispute is really not with those who disagree with my theology or even with those who say there is no G-d: rather, it is with those who do not believe that the One True Light shines in the view that we are all sisters and brothers, or who claim that our love, for those we meet in our ordinary lives, is the one feature that essentially distinguishes us from dull clods of clay

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Response to struggle4progress (Reply #16)

Sun Aug 7, 2016, 09:48 PM

17. Are you a bible literalist?

I'm Okay with fictitious fables, but please don't insult our intelligence by presenting them as factual like you just did.

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Response to Cartoonist (Reply #17)

Sun Aug 7, 2016, 11:28 PM

18. As you know, but pretend not to know, the point of the story does not in any way depend

on whether the story is -- or is not -- demonstrable as historical fact

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Response to MellowDem (Original post)

Thu Aug 11, 2016, 09:51 AM

19. While I was brought up Roman Catholic, and then Baptist by association before converting to Wicca

I'd like to while teaching my kids (Goddess forbid) what I believe, encourage them to keep an open mind as to what they want to believe in when they're old enough to understand it. Does this run counter to your belief, do you believe this is even a possibility? I personally believe religious indoctrination isn't exactly a conscious decision for most, but just... Families continuing to do what they do, I was taken to church every Sunday because my mother went to church every Sunday while my stepfather was out at work-- not like she had the money to hire a babysitter.

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