HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Topics » Science » Science (Group) » Superb Full-Globe View of...

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 02:49 PM

Superb Full-Globe View of Mars from Indian orbiter

[img][/img]

This is one of the best full-globe images of Mars ever taken. And it's important to note that it's an actual photograph of Mars as an entire planet, not a mosaic of closer images taken over time. So it's that entire world captured in a given moment - about what you'd see out the window of a spaceship.

Note the dust storms in the Northern hemisphere. If you right click and select "View Image" and then magnify, you can see the faint wisp of the atmosphere on the limb.

25 replies, 2643 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 25 replies Author Time Post
Reply Superb Full-Globe View of Mars from Indian orbiter (Original post)
True Blue Door Sep 2014 OP
Autumn Sep 2014 #1
True Blue Door Sep 2014 #3
obxhead Sep 2014 #10
True Blue Door Sep 2014 #12
MisterP Sep 2014 #13
Autumn Sep 2014 #17
MisterP Sep 2014 #18
True Blue Door Sep 2014 #25
True Blue Door Sep 2014 #21
orpupilofnature57 Sep 2014 #2
riqster Sep 2014 #4
True Blue Door Sep 2014 #5
riqster Sep 2014 #6
alfredo Sep 2014 #7
SheilaT Sep 2014 #8
True Blue Door Sep 2014 #9
SheilaT Sep 2014 #16
True Blue Door Sep 2014 #22
TheVisitor Sep 2014 #11
True Blue Door Sep 2014 #15
samsingh Sep 2014 #14
bloomington-lib Sep 2014 #19
True Blue Door Sep 2014 #23
ret5hd Sep 2014 #20
True Blue Door Sep 2014 #24

Response to True Blue Door (Original post)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 02:53 PM

1. OMG simply stunning. Amazing what a country that doesn't spend all their money waging war can do

Rec

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Autumn (Reply #1)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 02:56 PM

3. We spend billions of dollars on Mars exploration.

But sometimes the US Mars program loses sight of how important naturalistic imagery is. The probes are overwhelmingly just designed to take images of scientific relevance rather than inspiring "celestial portraiture."

So, mostly black and white images of sand dunes and craters, pretty much. But NASA archives are wide open, so feel free to comb them:

http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/targetFamily/Mars

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to True Blue Door (Reply #3)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 05:41 PM

10. When compared to the trillions we spend on war

 

The pennies we put into space exploration is pathetic.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to obxhead (Reply #10)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 05:42 PM

12. True. But it remains the largest space budget of any country.

But I'd definitely support any level of higher funding. Literally. Ask me to vote for putting half the Pentagon budget into space exploration, I'm totally with that.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Autumn (Reply #1)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 05:49 PM

13. we just sent a Mars orbiter and it's there *right now*;

AND we've had full-globe pictures of Mars since the 90s!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MisterP (Reply #13)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 07:40 PM

17. Yeah, but just imagine where we would be if we didn't spend money on war.

We could go farther.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Autumn (Reply #17)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 07:52 PM

18. we're going to Pluto

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MisterP (Reply #18)

Tue Sep 30, 2014, 09:11 AM

25. I think the point being made is just that we should spend a lot more money on space

than we do, and a lot less money on worthless destruction.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to MisterP (Reply #13)

Tue Sep 30, 2014, 06:00 AM

21. Mosaics, mostly. NASA doesn't spend much time on portraiture.

Most of the photogenic full-globe images were from when Mars was still new to NASA. Now they're mostly about the closeups and the surface shots.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to True Blue Door (Original post)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 02:54 PM

2. " All of us are standing in the gutter, some of us are looking at the stars " ' The Pretenders '

 

Cool, Thanks .

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to True Blue Door (Original post)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 02:59 PM

4. Link to source?

Thanks!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink



Response to True Blue Door (Reply #5)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 03:01 PM

6. Thanks! Gonna bookmark it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to True Blue Door (Original post)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 04:30 PM

7. Beautiful. On the Mac it is "open image in new tab."

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to True Blue Door (Original post)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 05:34 PM

8. My son the budding astrophysicist sent

 

me this two days ago: http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2014/09241109-maven-returns-first-images-of-mars.html

I had no idea we also had something out there looking at Mars.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to SheilaT (Reply #8)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 05:40 PM

9. There are several current Mars orbiters.

But NASA has been doing it for so long they kind of lose touch with the wonder, and mostly just take scientific pictures.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to True Blue Door (Reply #9)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 07:14 PM

16. SEVERAL Mars orbiters??

 

I had no idea! And budding astrophysicist son didn't tell me that!

In his defense, he's currently doing research on galaxy colliding, some something as close as Mars may not be as much on his radar as some other things.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to SheilaT (Reply #16)

Tue Sep 30, 2014, 06:11 AM

22. The currently operational Mars orbiters (in addition to Mangalyaan) are:

Mars Odyssey (USA - arrived Oct. 2001)
Mars Express (Europe - arrived Dec. 2003)
Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (USA - arrived March 2006)
MAVEN (USA - arrived Sept. 2014)

They also act as communications relays for the two currently operating surface rovers.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to True Blue Door (Original post)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 05:41 PM

11. Hey

It looks kind of like a giant lopsided Australia is in the middle there

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to TheVisitor (Reply #11)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 06:31 PM

15. The Western part is called Arabia Terra. The Eastern, Terra Sabaea.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to True Blue Door (Original post)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 05:49 PM

14. kick

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to True Blue Door (Original post)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 09:16 PM

19. I thought the white was ice and not dust storms. I was under the impression Mars didn't have storms

or really any wind.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bloomington-lib (Reply #19)

Tue Sep 30, 2014, 06:17 AM

23. It has a very thin atmosphere, but it has some very fine-grained, lightweight dust

that is periodically kicked up by even the thinnest of winds. Every few years there's a global dust storm that covers most of the planet. If you were there, you wouldn't see or feel any of the dust because it's so fine, but the sky would just become very dark. Some surface images of a local dust storm:

[img][img]

And there are ice caps at the poles, but they're very sharply delineated when not obscured by dust:

[img][/img]

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to True Blue Door (Original post)

Mon Sep 29, 2014, 09:39 PM

20. "... faint wisp of the atmosphere on the limb."

I don't know what you mean.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to ret5hd (Reply #20)

Tue Sep 30, 2014, 06:23 AM

24. The edge of the planet. In the high-res magnification you can see

a wispy membrane just above the edge of the planet. That's the atmosphere.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread