HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Stuart G » Journal
Page: 1

Stuart G

Profile Information

Gender: Male
Hometown: no where
Current location: ????
Member since: Tue Dec 18, 2007, 12:07 PM
Number of posts: 22,468

About Me

I thought I knew a lot, and I found out... how little I knew about what I know. And how much more there is to learn, if I listen and read what others have to say.

Journal Archives

Made in America: Global Companies Expand in U.S. Towns.

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/made-america-semiconductor-company-brings-jobs-training-ny/story?id=16231330

ABC News


BY DAVID MUIR , ERIC NOLL AND ENJOLI FRANCIS

April 30, 2012


When Global Foundries was seeking a home for its new $7 billion factory, it skipped over Germany and Singapore, where it already has facilities, and settled on the small town of Malta in upstate New York.

"We got a call from folks in New York who had been investing in infrastructure and workforce and everything," said Travis Bullard, a spokesman for the company, which is 100 percent owned by ATIC of Abu Dhabi. "We came up and looked at a few sites around New York and ultimately decided to build here."

Now the semiconductor-making site employs about 1,300 people, with plans to reach 1,600 by the end of the year

"These machines, our technicians, are doing extremely advanced manufacturing work," he said about the process of making silicon wafers. "They're manipulating individual atoms with the use of light and chemistry."

Global Foundries also has partnered with 17 community colleges and a high school to provide those looking for work or a new career path with the proper skills.

The Man the Banks Fear Most, The American Prospect/ Huffington Post

http://prospect.org/article/man-banks-fear-most

The Man the Banks Fear Most
Harold Meyerson

April 23, 2012


Wall Street's gone largely unpunished for its role in 
wrecking the economy—until New York Attorney General 
Eric Schneiderman came along.




In February 2011, one month after he’d been sworn in as New York state’s attorney general, Eric Schneiderman sat down with the staff attorney who’d been delegated to track the negotiations that the 50 state attorneys general and the Obama administration were conducting with five of the country’s biggest banks. A few months earlier, the story had broken that the banks had been “robo-signing” thousands of notices foreclosing on homes. Instead of assessing how far behind in their payments the homeowners had fallen or seeking to modify the terms of their mortgages, the banks had employed junior staffers, some hired right off the street, to sign hundreds of foreclosure documents daily, though the banks’ title to many of the properties was uncertain. Even when the banks’ claims to ownership were clear, robo-signing violated numerous state laws requiring due diligence before a bank can foreclose on a home.

The scandal had prompted a number of banks—Bank of America most prominently—to suspend their foreclosures for a while. The Justice Department, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the state attorneys general had initiated talks with Bank of America, as well as JPMorgan Chase, Citibank, Wells Fargo, and Ally Financial to arrive at a settlement for these abuses. As the only state law-enforcement official with direct jurisdiction over Wall Street, Schneiderman had been named to the committee the attorneys general had established to negotiate with the banks. He asked his aide how the talks were going.

“I was told it was being handled,” he says. The administration, his aide informed him, had proposed that the banks come up with $20 billion for aggrieved homeowners and former homeowners. Schneiderman wasn’t satisfied. What documents, he asked, had been subpoenaed? None, he was told. Who’d been called in to testify? Nobody, he was told. Most important, what did the banks want in return for paying the penalty? The aide responded that the issue had never been raised. Schneiderman was shocked.

The New Driver....Joke #23

Junior had just received his brand new drivers license. To celebrate, the whole family trooped out to the driveway and climbed into the car for his inaugural drive. Dad immediately headed to the back seat, directly behind the newly minted driver.

"I'll bet you're back there to get a change of scenery after all those months of sitting in the front passenger seat teaching me how to drive," said the beaming boy to his dad.

"Nope," came dad's reply, "I'm gonna sit here and kick the back of your seat as you drive, just like you've been doing to me for sixteen years."
Go to Page: 1