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marble falls

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Name: had to remove
Gender: Do not display
Hometown: marble falls, tx
Member since: Thu Feb 23, 2012, 03:49 AM
Number of posts: 19,925

About Me

Hand dyer mainly to the quilters market, doll maker, oil painter and teacher, anti-fas, cat owner, anti nuke, ex navy, reasonably good cook, father of three happy successful kids and three happy grand kids. Life is good.

Journal Archives

'If I were the White House, I would be concerned': Ex-Trump aide

‘If I were the White House, I would be concerned’: Ex-Trump aide gets spooked after Russia probe testimony

https://www.alternet.org/2019/01/if-i-were-the-white-house-i-would-be-concerned-ex-trump-aide-gets-spooked-after-russia-probe-testimony/

written by Cody Fenwick January 12, 2019

Sam Nunberg, one of President Donald Trump’s first aides from early on in his campaign in 2015, gave extensive testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee Friday as part of its investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

“They are doing an exhaustive investigation,” Nunberg said in an interview with NBC News.

The investigation, he explained, seems to be “narrowly focused on collusion.”

“If I were the White House,” he added, “I would be concerned.”

Nunberg has previously been subpoenaed to testify before Special Counsel Robert Mueller. He drew nationwide attention when he made a show, at first, of refusing the subpoena. He eventually complied and testified.

Nunberg is a close friend of Trump ally Roger Stone, who is believed to be target of Mueller’s investigation. Stone was Nunberg’s initial connection to the campaign, but Nunberg was fired early on because of his “racially charged Facebook posts,” according to NBC News.

<snip>

The former Trump aide described to NBC News an extensive grilling that lasted over four hours. The report explained:

In the interview with the Senate Intelligence Committee, Nunberg said he was asked about numerous former campaign staff members, the president’s children and other associates including: Roger Stone, Jerome Corsi, Paul Manafort, Michael Flynn, Tom Barrack, Michael Cohen, Steve Bannon, Donald Trump Jr and Eric Trump. He was also asked about Trump’s relationship with Aras Agalarov, a Russian oligarch, and his pop-singer son, Emin, who helped set up the 2016 Trump Tower meeting.


<snip>


Among the other topics raised Friday, Nunberg said, were the 2016 meeting in Trump Tower in New York with Trump Jr, Manafort, Kushner and a Kremlin-connected Russian lawyer offering them the promise of “dirt” on Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton; Trump’s travel to Moscow in 2013 for the Miss Universe pageant; the company’s interest in building a tower in the Russian capital.

NBC News reports that despite the relative comity among the Senate committee members, it may be difficult for them to reach consensus on their conclusions with regard to Trump campaign members’ collusion with Russian agents. The House Intelligence Committee, then led by Rep. Devin Nunes (R-CA), issued a partisan report last year backed only by the Republicans purportedly clearing Trump and his campaign of wrongdoing. Rep. Adam Schiff (D-CA) has taken control of the committee since the new Democratic majority in the House was sworn in, and he plans to dig back into the investigation.

Michael Cohen to Testify Publicly Before House


Michael Cohen to Testify Publicly Before House
by Aidan McLaughlin | Jan 10th, 2019, 3:25 pm 3123

submit to reddit

President Donald Trump‘s former lawyer Michael Cohen is set to testify publicly before the House Oversight Committee, Democrats announced on Thursday.

Cohen, who was recently sentenced to three years in prison after being charged with orchestrating illegal hush money payments to women alleging affairs with Trump during the 2016 election. He was also charged with lying to Congress about plans to build a Trump tower in Moscow in 2016.

Cohen said he will “give a full and credible account of the events that have transpired.”

“I thank Michael Cohen for agreeing to testify before the Oversight Committee voluntarily,” said Rep. Elijah Cummings, the House Oversight chairman.

The public hearing is scheduled for February 7, 2019. Rep. Adam Schiff, the chairman of the House intelligence committee, also said he would be seeking a closed door hearing with Cohen.

UPDATE: Cohen issued a statement addressing his hearing:

My statement regarding testifying publicly before Congress: pic.twitter.com/apNhAdfVds

— Michael Cohen (@MichaelCohen212) January 10, 2019

Donal Trump's "concrete wall" commencement speech at Wagner college 2006

?t=706

Great moments in mouth breathing: Trump's speech

https://twitter.com/MudflapOfficial/status/1082838155147960321/video/1
Posted by marble falls | Wed Jan 9, 2019, 09:08 AM (6 replies)

Eyewitness experiment

Posted by marble falls | Sun Jan 6, 2019, 10:53 AM (1 replies)

Arabic anti-Trump music video

The one I meant to post:









Keeping this one because I like it


Posted by marble falls | Sat Jan 5, 2019, 08:56 AM (8 replies)

Which is easier to believe:

I do have a question for Seceretary Neilsen ...

If we all agree prison is a school for crime, why are we separating thousands of children from family and confining them in groups in chain linked cells?

And then just dumping folks at Christmas in El Paso.

Jeff Flake Won't Rule Out 2020 Run: 'Somebody Needs To' Challenge Trump

Source: HuffPo


Jeff Flake Won’t Rule Out 2020 Run: ‘Somebody Needs To’ Challenge Trump

“Like I said, I haven’t ruled it out,” he said. “I’m a long way from there, but somebody needs to and I think that the country needs to be reminded of what it means to be conservative.”

By Amy Russo

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/jeff-flake-2020_us_5c2740e4e4b08aaf7a90cd27

Outgoing Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.) is leaving Congress in the coming days, but he isn’t yet crossing a presidential run off his list of possibilities.

<snip>

“Like I said, I haven’t ruled it out,” Flake said. “I’m a long way from there, but somebody needs to and I think that the country needs to be reminded of what it means to be conservative, certainly on the Republican side, and what it means to be decent as well, because we need a lot more of that in our politics.”

<snip>

Flake, who has had an openly tumultuous relationship with Trump, criticized him for blaming Democrats for the federal government shutdown, which has now entered its eighth day as Congress remains in a standoff over a spending bill including money to build a border wall.

“Anytime you stand and say ‘I own the shutdown,’ then you own it,” he told Acosta, adding,”‘Shutdown 101’ tells you ‘shift the blame if you can.’ And when the president immediately said, ‘I’ll take the blame,’ then he’s got it.”

Read more: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/jeff-flake-2020_us_5c2740e4e4b08aaf7a90cd27



He will take a nomination but he'll never be elected. Why did he almost always vote with cheetolini???

The Inevitability of Impeachment

The Inevitability of Impeachment

Even Republicans may be deciding that the president has become too great a burden to their party or too great a danger to the country.

By Elizabeth Drew

Ms. Drew is a journalist based in Washington who covered Watergate.

Dec. 27, 2018

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/27/opinion/trump-impeachment-resign-drew.html

A billboard asking people to sign a petition calling for the impeachment of President Trump in Times Square in New York last year.CreditJustin Lane/European Pressphoto Agency

?quality=90&auto=webp


An impeachment process against President Trump now seems inescapable. Unless the president resigns, the pressure by the public on the Democratic leaders to begin an impeachment process next year will only increase. Too many people think in terms of stasis: How things are is how they will remain. They don’t take into account that opinion moves with events.

Whether or not there’s already enough evidence to impeach Mr. Trump — I think there is — we will learn what the special counsel, Robert Mueller, has found, even if his investigation is cut short. A significant number of Republican candidates didn’t want to run with Mr. Trump in the midterms, and the results of those elections didn’t exactly strengthen his standing within his party. His political status, weak for some time, is now hurtling downhill.

The midterms were followed by new revelations in criminal investigations of once-close advisers as well as new scandals involving Mr. Trump himself. The odor of personal corruption on the president’s part — perhaps affecting his foreign policy — grew stronger. Then the events of the past several days — the president’s precipitous decision to pull American troops out of Syria, Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis’s abrupt resignation, the swoon in the stock market, the pointless shutdown of parts of the government — instilled a new sense of alarm among many Republicans.

<snip>

Impeachment was the founders’ method of holding a president accountable between elections. Determined to avoid setting up a king in all but name, they put the decision about whether a president should be allowed to continue to serve in the hands of the representatives of the people who elected him.

The founders understood that overturning the results of a presidential election must be approached with care and that they needed to prevent the use of that power as a partisan exercise or by a faction. So they wrote into the Constitution provisions to make it extremely difficult for Congress to remove a president from office, including that after an impeachment vote in the House, the Senate would hold a trial, with a two-thirds vote needed for conviction.

Lost in all the discussion about possible lawbreaking by Mr. Trump is the fact that impeachment wasn’t intended only for crimes. For example, in 1974 the House Judiciary Committee charged Richard Nixon with, among other things, abusing power by using the I.R.S. against his political enemies. The committee also held the president accountable for misdeeds by his aides and for failing to honor the oath of office’s pledge that a president must “take care that the laws be faithfully executed.”

<snip>
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