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bronxiteforever

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Hometown: Pennsylvania
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Member since: Fri Jun 30, 2006, 07:47 PM
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The heat index in Galveston has remained above 100 for over 30 hours.

Even in the dead of night, there’s no respite. The Texas Gulf Coast city registered its warmest low temperature on record Thursday.
Washington Post
By Matthew Cappucci
August 9 at 4:29 PM

The heat index hit 100 degrees at 5:52 a.m. Thursday in Galveston, Tex. And, as of Friday afternoon, it hadn’t dropped below the century mark since. It’s part of a larger heat wave across the Deep South and Southern Plains that shows no signs of letting up through at least next week.

The National Weather Service in Houston issued an excessive heat warning for “high heat index values between 108 and 114 degrees” during the day on Thursday. Heat advisories stretched over 1,000 miles from the U.S./Mexico border to Georgia, encompassing more than 30 million in the forecast for “dangerous heat.” Galveston failed to drop below 86 degrees Thursday, marking its warmest all-time low temperature on record! Records there date back to 1874. Galveston also set a daily record high Thursday, hitting 96 degrees.

Sure it’s summer, and it’s supposed to be hot. What makes this heat wave noteworthy is the exceptional humidity accompanying it. It’s much more difficult to get high temperatures when there’s copious water in the air. It’s because of water’s inherent “thermal inertia,” or the tendency for water to put the brakes on big temperature swings.

Gulf of Mexico water temperatures are running between 1 and 2 degrees above average. That adds additional water vapor to the air. Thrust atop an environment that’s already warming due to climate change, and these sorts of oppressive heat waves are becoming and will continue to be increasingly common in the years ahead.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2019/08/09/heat-index-galveston-has-remained-above-over-hours-its-part-another-major-heat-wave/
Posted by bronxiteforever | Fri Aug 9, 2019, 05:11 PM (5 replies)

The heat index in Galveston has remained above 100 for over 30 hours.

Even in the dead of night, there’s no respite. The Texas Gulf Coast city registered its warmest low temperature on record Thursday.
Washington Post
By Matthew Cappucci
August 9 at 4:29 PM

The heat index hit 100 degrees at 5:52 a.m. Thursday in Galveston, Tex. And, as of Friday afternoon, it hadn’t dropped below the century mark since. It’s part of a larger heat wave across the Deep South and Southern Plains that shows no signs of letting up through at least next week.

The National Weather Service in Houston issued an excessive heat warning for “high heat index values between 108 and 114 degrees” during the day on Thursday. Heat advisories stretched over 1,000 miles from the U.S./Mexico border to Georgia, encompassing more than 30 million in the forecast for “dangerous heat.” Galveston failed to drop below 86 degrees Thursday, marking its warmest all-time low temperature on record! Records there date back to 1874. Galveston also set a daily record high Thursday, hitting 96 degrees.

Sure it’s summer, and it’s supposed to be hot. What makes this heat wave noteworthy is the exceptional humidity accompanying it. It’s much more difficult to get high temperatures when there’s copious water in the air. It’s because of water’s inherent “thermal inertia,” or the tendency for water to put the brakes on big temperature swings.

Gulf of Mexico water temperatures are running between 1 and 2 degrees above average. That adds additional water vapor to the air. Thrust atop an environment that’s already warming due to climate change, and these sorts of oppressive heat waves are becoming and will continue to be increasingly common in the years ahead.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/weather/2019/08/09/heat-index-galveston-has-remained-above-over-hours-its-part-another-major-heat-wave/


Posted by bronxiteforever | Fri Aug 9, 2019, 05:10 PM (1 replies)

Report on Lake Tahoe "It is changing"

TheUnion
News for Nevada County, California
It is changing’
Environment | August 8, 2019

Justin Scacco
Special to The Union

...“We all love Tahoe,” said Schladow, director of the University of California, Davis Tahoe Environmental Research Center. “Tahoe’s beautiful. It’s like no other place on earth, but it is changing....During the past 107 years, daily air temperatures measured in Tahoe City have increased. The average daily maximum temperature has risen by 2.25 degrees Fahrenheit, and the average daily minimum temperature has risen by 4.43 degrees. According to the report, the number of days when air temperatures averaged below freezing has declined by about 30 days since 1911, though year-to-year variability is high.

Furthermore, rising temperatures are forecast to change the Tahoe area from a snow-based hydrology to a rain-based hydrology by the final third of the century, moving the time of peak streamflows from June to January.

“When you suddenly don’t have a snowpack storing water, you’re getting rain reaching the stream much sooner, much higher flows, potential for more erosion, potential for bridges to be washed out, and we as engineers can deal with that,” said Schladow. “Think, however, if you’re a fish and your time of year for spawning is when those flows are happening … used to happen in June, now it happens in January. I wish I could tell you what that means.”

While Schladow painted a grim picture for the future of the area as the climate warms, he indicated there is hope to protect the lake’s clarity against warming temperatures. “We cannot keep the lake cooler,” he said. “We cannot stop snow from turning into rain, but maybe we can maintain clarity in the face of all these things.”

https://www.theunion.com/news/environment/it-is-changing/

A study referenced in the article found, that if we do nothing about climate change, average maximum temperatures would rise by 9 degrees Fahrenheit in the basin by the end of the century.
Posted by bronxiteforever | Thu Aug 8, 2019, 10:21 PM (0 replies)
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