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marble falls

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Name: had to remove
Gender: Do not display
Hometown: marble falls, tx
Member since: Thu Feb 23, 2012, 03:49 AM
Number of posts: 25,235

About Me

Hand dyer mainly to the quilters market, doll maker, oil painter and teacher, anti-fas, cat owner, anti nuke, ex navy, reasonably good cook, father of three happy successful kids and three happy grand kids. Life is good.

Journal Archives

The World Accordion to Trump ...

Phoenix Police Have Now Shot 10 People This Year; Eight Died

Phoenix Police Have Now Shot 10 People This Year; Eight Died

Meg O'Connor | August 28, 2019 | 12:27pm

https://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/phoenix-police-shot-10-people-2019-viral-video-racist-facebook-posts-11350451

A Phoenix police officer shot a man on Tuesday night, August 27, following reports that someone had been firing shots into the air in near 36th Street and Palm Lane. The man, whose name police have yet to disclose, is the 10th person to be shot this year by Phoenix police.

Phoenix Police Detective Luis Samudio said that around 6:30 p.m., officers responded to a call that someone had fired shots into the air. When police went to the home they believed the shooting came from, a 34-year-old man holding a long rifle opened the door.

A Phoenix police officer shot the man upon seeing him holding the gun, Samudio said, adding that he does not yet know whether the man was pointing the gun at the officer or simply holding it.

"When the individual opened the door, he had his long rifle with him, and that's when the officer had to fire his weapon," Samudio told reporters last night. "I don't know the direction [he was pointing the gun], but obviously there was some kind of threat."


Samudio said the man was taken to a hospital and treated for non-life-threatening injuries, but could not provide more details on the man or the officer who shot him. No officers were injured. Samudio said police believe the man was firing shots into the air in his own backyard.

So far this year, Phoenix police have shot nine other people. Eight were killed. Before last night, the last shooting occurred on May 26, when Phoenix police critically wounded a 24-year-old man they allege pulled a gun on them.

The eight other police shootings so far this year, beginning with the most recent:

<snip>

Last week, Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams and Mayor Kate Gallego said Phoenix police will now be required to document every time they point a gun at someone. The change in policy comes after a National Police Foundation study examining Phoenix police's unusually high number of police shootings came up short on answers.

“This will allow us to have a real idea of how many times our officers are able to successfully de-escalate a situation with the potential of deadly force,” Williams said.

The department has been mired in controversy in recent months following news that 97 current and former officers had shared racist content on Facebook, as well as the release of a viral video of a Phoenix police officer threatening to shoot an unarmed black man in the head in front of his family.

"Police cannot be the judge, jury, and executioners in our community," said Viri Hernandez, director of Poder in Action, a police reform group, at a City Council meeting in May where the council discussed increased funding for the police department. Hernandez is also a member of the ad hoc committee on police reform Gallego established earlier this month. The committee's first meeting is tomorrow.

"We believe in consequences when these things happen, but more than that, we believe in solutions to hold the humanity of every single human being in our community," Hernandez said. "There are ways that we can spend resources to stop these things from happening, instead of continuing to spend more money on surveillance, on policing, on criminalization of our communities."

Meg O'Connor is a staff writer for Phoenix New Times. She previously worked for the Miami New Times.

Contact: Meg O'Connor

Follow: Twitter: @megoconnor13

Having had my first nasal tube (to drain fluid in my gastro-tract) after my last surgery,...

I am qualified to say, especially because I was co-operating with my procedure, forced feeding by nasal tube is all about torture. Its used not humanely or in an humanitarian process. Its used to modify a behavior to bring about an outcome not in the victims choice or benefit. Its used to manifest an authority's will in the guise of a medical intervention.

Anybody here know of a band from Overland Park(?) called Joeyess and the Truth Lubes?

Do they perform this:




Looking to contact them.

Anybody here know of a band from Overland Park(?) called Joeyess and the Truth Lubes?

Do they perform this:


When Solitary Confinement Is A Death Sentence


When Solitary Confinement Is A Death Sentence
Mariam Abdullah died by suicide after the teen spent much of the final two years of her life in solitary confinement.

By Lisa Armstrong
08/29/2019 06:03 am ET

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/solitary-confinement-suicide-prison-teens_n_5d63f4d3e4b01d7b529317aa?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuaHVmZnBvc3QuY29tLw&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAFIEU_tUDrcUfv1s6ffoQJwH-1IbEdzy6hFj7-yDo4qRAA1lRezWs77LieA7dSUrTuW0JwreZ-m7JKkW1vOAs1gDEa9v735N7B-9jBrMzvExVXxErhG2xfecEA5FVfxumKkzdaBN-yxEpCOnc50L9yC9PasYO02XB-eYxlLHAld-

Their friendship began on July 17, 2014, with whispered secrets shared through the vent in the wall that separated their cells.

Jessica Burlew remembers the exact date because she’d turned 17 the day before, the same day that Mariam Abdullah, then 16 and about to be charged as an adult with armed robbery, had been brought to Estrella Jail in Phoenix, Arizona.

When Abdullah arrived, shackled and belly chained, in the closed custody unit, where girls deemed incorrigible were held in their cells for 23 hours a day, Burlew had been there for about six months. In that time, Burlew said she hadn’t had any contact with other teens and so was glad to hear Abdullah’s voice.

“I very much did consider Mariam a birthday present,” Burlew, now 22, wrote from Perryville Prison in Goodyear, Arizona, where she is serving a 10-year sentence.

Over the months they were held in isolation, speaking through that vent, Burlew and Abdullah shared the things that teenagers do.

Abdullah’s favorite color was red. She wanted to be a firefighter. Her favorite musical artist was Drake.

She was silly, rambunctious and seemingly carefree. Still, the isolation wore on her.

For the next two years, Abdullah spent much of her time separated from others, both to discipline her for what was classified as unruly behavior and to prevent her from harming herself. After she was transferred to Perryville in July 2015, she was in and out of solitary confinement in the minors unit for various infractions. Just after she turned 18, she was transferred to the Lumley Unit, the most restrictive unit in the prison where offenders were confined in their cells 23 hours a day, with one hour of recreation spent in a cage under the searing Arizona sun. When she was not in her assigned cell, Abdullah was in suicide watch cells, where again she was alone. Officers more than once carried her there by force.

After another woman in the prison, Cynthia Apkaw, died by suicide in August 2015, Abdullah wrote in a letter to a friend: “To be honest with you being here makes me feel like that but I just havent acted on it yet.”

On July 19, 2016, she did. A handwritten poem found in her cell after her death read in part:

In this place is a struggle for her

She’s alive but not living

She’s feeling everything, feeling nothing

Tired of existing and longing to join

Those who truly know peace

The dead.

HuffPost examined some 200 documents, videos and photographs from Abdullah’s time behind bars, interviewed 16 people who knew her and reviewed her letters and other writings for this account of her life and death in isolation.

The almost 2.2 million people in correctional facilities in the United States are often amongst the most vulnerable, with troubles — mental illness, addiction, social disenfranchisement — that put them at a high risk of suicide before they even enter a cell. Incarceration exacerbates these problems; isolation makes a bad situation worse.

“So much of who we are and how we function is implicitly dependent on interaction with other people. It’s such a natural part of human life that it’s almost as second nature as breathing,” said Craig Haney, professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz and an expert on the impact of solitary confinement. “When all of that stuff is taken away, it’s destabilizing, psychologically unsettling, in a very profound way.”
AdChoices

Self-harm and suicide rates in some state and federal correctional facilities have risen dramatically in recent years, an issue most recently highlighted by the death of financier Jeffrey Epstein, whose body was found in a federal facility in New York on Aug. 10. Shortly before his death, Epstein, who was awaiting trial on charges of sex trafficking, had been moved from suicide watch to a special housing unit.

Mental health experts and advocates say that the use of solitary confinement is a factor in many cases of suicide. The most recent nationwide data released by the federal Bureau of Justice Statistics shows that prisoner deaths by suicide in state prisons increased roughly 30% between 2013 and 2014 — from 192 to 249 deaths.

<snip>

Arizona, where Abdullah died, is tied for sixth highest in its use of solitary confinement. It has also seen an uptick in the number of suicides and instances of self-harm. During the fiscal year in which Abdullah killed herself, six prisoners died by suicide in Arizona prisons. In fiscal year 2018, there were seven suicides and 708 recorded instances of self-harm. For the last three-quarters of fiscal year 2019, after the state changed how it documented these events, there were six suicides, 87 suicide attempts and 1,406 non-suicidal instances of self-harm in the average daily population of about 42,000 inmates. A spokesperson from the Arizona Department of Corrections said the significant increase in instances of self-harm from 2018 to 2019 was in part because the department has “implemented a new method of data collection that dramatically improved the quality and level of information gathered and reported.”

<snip>

In 2016, 40% of “long term secure facilities” reported locking youth in seclusion for at least four hours to “regain control of unruly behavior,” according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s Juvenile Residential Facility Census. In the same year, 21% of all juvenile residential facilities also reported locking youth in their rooms when they were deemed suicidal. The American Correctional Association, a nonprofit trade group that accredits correctional facilities, issued standards in 2018 that include banning the use of isolation beyond 30 days for minors and people with serious mental illness “unless there is an immediate and present danger to others,” but it’s not clear whether those standards have had any effect.

And while there are generally limits on the amount of time minors can be isolated in juvenile facilities, if they are charged as adults, then they are typically subject to the rules of the adult facility.

Correctional facilities isolate people to punish them for behavioral issues or to prevent them from harming themselves or being harmed by others. But even when the isolation is purportedly for the person’s own good, experts say that being alone for 23 hours a day in a concrete cell typically smaller than a parking space takes a toll.

At Perryville, women “on watch” are initially stripped of their clothes, dressed in a short smock, and left in a bare cell where corrections officers either watch them continuously or do checks at 10- or 30-minute intervals, according to interviews with currently and formerly incarcerated women and a former Perryville mental health professional.

<HUGE! snip>

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Beyond providing the videos and records concerning Abdullah’s time in prison, Corrections Department officials declined to comment for this story. In their records documenting the use of force on July 10, prison staff note several times that they “assisted” or “placed” Abdullah on the ground, using “the least amount of force” necessary.

Abdullah’s mother did not want to speak publicly about her daughter’s death, but she talked with Kendrick shortly after Abdullah died.

“She kept saying, ‘I think she was murdered. I think she was murdered,’” Kendrick recalled. “But the longer I talked to her, I think it was more metaphorical. She was murdered by being bullied and not protected and not having adequate mental health care.”

One of the last times Hernandez saw Abdullah was on the eve of Hernandez’s 18th birthday, before she was transferred at midnight to the adult side of Estrella Jail. The girls wished Hernandez happy birthday, told her they loved her and were going to miss her.

“Mariam, she gave me a big old hug,” said Hernandez. “She said, ‘I’m going to see you.’”

Abdullah said that when she was released, she was going to take Hernandez to visit her mother in Tucson. They continued to write each other after Hernandez was let out of jail.

Hernandez keeps Abdullah’s letters in a shoebox in her closet. In most of them, Abdullah sounds upbeat. There are letters with drawings: stick figures of Abdullah and Hernandez, with butterflies and hearts, and “Mariam + Reyna = together forever.” But on one postcard, Abdullah writes about how hard it is to so often be alone.

“It was solitary,” Hernandez said, as she speculated about what it was that led Abdullah to take her own life. “It was so much over a period of time — and maybe lack of communication with us, friends, family. Maybe the meds.”

Though she’d caught glimpses of Abdullah’s sadness, Hernandez still struggles to accept her suicide, especially since she was just six months away from being released.

“She was strong. This is the girl, no matter what happens, she was going to be fine,” Hernandez said, her voice trailing off. “I don’t understand, I don’t understand it, I don’t understand …”

Lisa Armstrong is a 2019 United States Artists Fellow in Writing and a 2018 Justice Reporting Fellow for the John Jay/Langeloth Foundation Fellowship on Reinventing Solitary Confinement.

Original art by Isabella Carapella.

This article was reported in partnership with Type Investigations.








In this place is a struggle for her

She’s alive but not living

She’s feeling everything, feeling nothing

Tired of existing and longing to join

Those who truly know peace

The dead.



We kill people by denying them hope. By not even keeping to standards we force people to treat animals.

Because Trumps still here, its time to roll this one out again ...



From the original posting of this on youtube ren years ago:

We're all in this together, folks.

This is a rant about the greed that permeates the American political landscape. In fact the very core of who we are as a nation and a people.

Until we re-regulate our glorious corporate overlords, our condition -the Human Condition- in this country and on this planet remains in the hands of a select group of sociopathic plutocrats that care nothing of their nation and only about their personal fortunes.

Self appointed Masters of the Universe who don't seem to realize that their gene pool has been diminished and dulled by decades of greed, avarice and a sense of entitlement.

All born on 3rd base, swearing they hit a triple.

We Were RIght. They will devour themselves.

My only hope is that the rest of us survive the feast.

XPost from GD: 'I'm Gonna Die in Here'

'I'm Gonna Die in Here': 19-Year-Old Mentally Ill Woman Remains in Jail for Spitting

Hannah Critchfield | August 22, 2019 | 7:00am

https://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/mentally-ill-arizona-woman-remains-in-jail-for-spitting-11346829

When Vangelina Gloria received a call that her daughter had been arrested in February 2019, she was not surprised. At age 19, her daughter Valentina Gloria was no stranger to the courts — she’d been diagnosed with autism and serious mental illness while she was still a minor, and her past arrests had all stemmed from someone calling the police during previous mental health crises.

<edit>

But then, an attorney at the Office of the Public Defender gave her a video from December 2018 that shows Maricopa County officers handcuffing a visibly upset Valentina to a table during a mental health episode. Halfway through the video, she spits on one of the officers.

Valentina has spent five months in jail for this act. It’s still unclear from interviews if she fully understands what’s happening to her, or why. Due to her ongoing mental incapacity, a hearing on July 23 ruled that Valentina will have to wait at least another two months, without bail, before a court will hear her case.

In the meantime, Valentina remains in the Maricopa County jail system, forced to reap the consequences of a criminal justice system that was not made for her — at the expense of her physical and mental health.

Valentina’s stay in jail began in February, when she was arrested for allegedly assaulting a medical health professional while experiencing an episode at an in-patient facility she’d checked into that morning. From there, she was booked into Maricopa County jail for a probation violation.

Charges were not pressed, but her mother soon learned she would not be released. The Maricopa County Attorney’s Office was demanding she be held on felony charges related to a spitting incident that happened two months before. That incident began with an arrest on December 29, 2018; Valentina attacked two nurses during yet another mental health crisis at St. Luke’s Hospital in Phoenix, where she was receiving in-patient care.

The hospital called authorities, and deputies took her to Lower Buckeye Jail, where her arms and legs were restrained with handcuffs and leather cuffs, her body stretched out like the letter X on a bed to limit her range of movement.

Two days later, Valentina was still in jail. It was New Year’s Eve 2018. What happened next can be seen in a video given to Vangelina by Eliana Ray Eitches, attorney at the Office of the Public Defender representing the defendant (Vangelina was subsequently assigned a new attorney when she was transferred to another court).

The video shows a calm, still-restrained Valentina being released to use the bathroom. After she does so, she returns to the bed for uniformed officers to chain her back down. But when it comes time to lift her hands up for officers to handcuff her, she pauses. “It’s cold,” she says.

Within four seconds, the officers force her arms back, and Valentina immediately begins to panic.

She sobs and shakes during the entire process. The correctional employees speak calmly, calling her only by her last name. As an officer adjusts a restraint on her right foot, she spits. It hits his cheek.

The officers yell at her, and place a spit mask over her head. A staff member of Correctional Health Services, which contracts with the jail to provide mental health services, is then seen entering for the first time.

This is the crime for which Valentina remains incarcerated. The charges of assault against the nurses at St. Luke’s were dropped a month later. The prosecutor’s office cited Valentina’s mental state as the justification for dismissing the felonies. But the office is still prosecuting her on two counts of “assault by a prisoner with bodily fluids” and two counts of aggravated assault, which also appear related to spitting.

“I guess people think once you’re an inmate, you’re an inmate, and you deserve to be there, to be punished,” said Vangelina. “But when she’s going through a crisis, she’s not controlling what’s going on, either. You have to give her time to de-escalate, be compassionate. They say the people with the mental illness don’t have empathy, but I think it’s the other way around at this point.”

<snip>


There is no way to edit this down. The much longer remainder of this story is at the link. Its a harrowing and important read.

'I'm Gonna Die in Here'

'I'm Gonna Die in Here': 19-Year-Old Mentally Ill Woman Remains in Jail for Spitting

Hannah Critchfield | August 22, 2019 | 7:00am

https://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/mentally-ill-arizona-woman-remains-in-jail-for-spitting-11346829

When Vangelina Gloria received a call that her daughter had been arrested in February 2019, she was not surprised. At age 19, her daughter Valentina Gloria was no stranger to the courts — she’d been diagnosed with autism and serious mental illness while she was still a minor, and her past arrests had all stemmed from someone calling the police during previous mental health crises.

<edit>

But then, an attorney at the Office of the Public Defender gave her a video from December 2018 that shows Maricopa County officers handcuffing a visibly upset Valentina to a table during a mental health episode. Halfway through the video, she spits on one of the officers.

Valentina has spent five months in jail for this act. It’s still unclear from interviews if she fully understands what’s happening to her, or why. Due to her ongoing mental incapacity, a hearing on July 23 ruled that Valentina will have to wait at least another two months, without bail, before a court will hear her case.

In the meantime, Valentina remains in the Maricopa County jail system, forced to reap the consequences of a criminal justice system that was not made for her — at the expense of her physical and mental health.

Valentina’s stay in jail began in February, when she was arrested for allegedly assaulting a medical health professional while experiencing an episode at an in-patient facility she’d checked into that morning. From there, she was booked into Maricopa County jail for a probation violation.

Charges were not pressed, but her mother soon learned she would not be released. The Maricopa County Attorney’s Office was demanding she be held on felony charges related to a spitting incident that happened two months before. That incident began with an arrest on December 29, 2018; Valentina attacked two nurses during yet another mental health crisis at St. Luke’s Hospital in Phoenix, where she was receiving in-patient care.

The hospital called authorities, and deputies took her to Lower Buckeye Jail, where her arms and legs were restrained with handcuffs and leather cuffs, her body stretched out like the letter X on a bed to limit her range of movement.

Two days later, Valentina was still in jail. It was New Year’s Eve 2018. What happened next can be seen in a video given to Vangelina by Eliana Ray Eitches, attorney at the Office of the Public Defender representing the defendant (Vangelina was subsequently assigned a new attorney when she was transferred to another court).

The video shows a calm, still-restrained Valentina being released to use the bathroom. After she does so, she returns to the bed for uniformed officers to chain her back down. But when it comes time to lift her hands up for officers to handcuff her, she pauses. “It’s cold,” she says.

Within four seconds, the officers force her arms back, and Valentina immediately begins to panic.

She sobs and shakes during the entire process. The correctional employees speak calmly, calling her only by her last name. As an officer adjusts a restraint on her right foot, she spits. It hits his cheek.

The officers yell at her, and place a spit mask over her head. A staff member of Correctional Health Services, which contracts with the jail to provide mental health services, is then seen entering for the first time.

This is the crime for which Valentina remains incarcerated. The charges of assault against the nurses at St. Luke’s were dropped a month later. The prosecutor’s office cited Valentina’s mental state as the justification for dismissing the felonies. But the office is still prosecuting her on two counts of “assault by a prisoner with bodily fluids” and two counts of aggravated assault, which also appear related to spitting.

“I guess people think once you’re an inmate, you’re an inmate, and you deserve to be there, to be punished,” said Vangelina. “But when she’s going through a crisis, she’s not controlling what’s going on, either. You have to give her time to de-escalate, be compassionate. They say the people with the mental illness don’t have empathy, but I think it’s the other way around at this point.”

<snip>


There is no way to edit this down. The much longer remainder of this story is at the link. Its a harrowing and important read.

Lindsey Graham To U.S. Consumers: 'Accept The Pain' Of Trump's Trade War

Lindsey Graham To U.S. Consumers: ‘Accept The Pain’ Of Trump’s Trade War

The Trump administration has repeatedly claimed its tariff battle with China isn’t hurting Americans.

By Amy Russo

https://www.huffpost.com/entry/lindsey-graham-american-consumers-must-accept-pain-of-trump-trade-war-china_n_5d62b8abe4b02cc97c8f6050

<snip>

“The Democrats for years have been claiming that China should be stood up to,” he said during an appearance on CBS’ “Face the Nation.” “Now Trump is and we just got to accept the pain that comes with standing up to China. How do you get China to change without creating some pain on them and us? I don’t know.”

The senator ― who has become a close ally of the president ― said that his South Carolina constituents would have to withstand “some” consequences of Trump’s escalating tariff battle, including a hike in consumer prices.

“We’re now at that part in the trade war where you feel increases at Walmart,” he said. However, just last week, White House trade adviser Peter Navarro claimed on CNN’s “State of the Union” that that there has been “absolutely no evidence in the price data” of the effects of the trade war, and that it is “not showing up in the consumer price index.”

In fact, data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows that the CPI crept upward by 0.3% in July, after rising by only 0.1% the previous month. Further, a recent JPMorgan analysis obtained by CNBC estimated that the fallout from the trade war will cost each American household $1,000 each year, wiping out nearly all of the effects of tax breaks included in Republicans’ recent tax code overhaul.

And it appears the administration is well aware the situation could worsen.

Earlier this month, the White House announced it would postpone roughly half of its 10% tariffs on $300 billion in Chinese goods, pushing the effective date from Sept. 1 to Dec. 15. Speaking to reporters, Trump described it as an effort to delay potential impacts on the Christmas shopping season.

<snip>

“I’d tell you, Mr. President, listen, you’ve got more bullets than they do. They sell us a lot more stuff than we sell them, and the goal is to get them to change their behavior,” he said. “Until they feel the pain, they’re not going to stop.”



Leningrad Lindsey Graham doesn't realize his party's love of deficit spending ends when China stops buying T-notes.

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